First spotted on David Farber's IP List

So it sounds like the 300 students who receive this grant have to take the MS C# class which replaces the C++ course. Pretty sleazy...

There is a student site about this. Following is a quote from CNET and a link to the CNET article.

Microsoft's grant has strings attached?

By Margaret Kane
Staff Writer, CNET News.com
August 16, 2002, 9:59 AM PT

update A collegiate grant from Microsoft has created an uproar after one of the recipients agreed to require a class in a Microsoft programming language as part of the deal.
Microsoft's grant has strings attached? - Tech News - CNET.com

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From a blog called "jzip" - Entry: Posted by adamsj at August 16, 2002 09:48 PM

I'll See Your Two Million Dollars, And Raise You Three Hundred Million

Via Dave Farber's Interesting People mailing list, I read that, in return for accepting "a $2.3 million grant the University of Waterloo...will offer a programming course in Microsoft's new C# language...which will...be mandatory for the 300 students per year who are accepted [into] the electrical and computer engineering department." (I believe I've honestly paraquoted the article--you can check me through the link below.)

But that's penny-ante next to this outrage, wherein the gutsy Arkansas Times "wanted to inspect documents pertaining to a $300 million gift from the Walton family foundation at Bentonville to the U of A. These are the Waltons of Wal-Mart, the world's biggest corporation and a noted driver of hard bargains. Do strings come attached to this sort of money," the Times wondered.

(It should be noted that Wal-Mart built its IT department largely out of UA comp sci graduates.)
Well, they still don't know, because the University of Arkansas, "its general counsel, Fred Harrison (salary $130,000), and three other fulltime University lawyers, plus three private lawyers hired with still more taxpayers' money to keep information from taxpayers" convinced Circuit Judge Chris Piazza to grant the Walton family the University a "competitive exemption" to the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act.

According to the Times, such exemptions were "intended to protect private companies in competition for government business. The courts had never held that it applied to public universities accepting gifts."

In other words, the University of Arkansas is getting a Freedom of Information Act exemption because it is a public business in competition for the largesse of a corporate foundation.

wow, what a mess. keep me out of it.

update A collegiate grant from Microsoft has created an uproar after one of the recipients agreed to require a class in a Microsoft programming language as part of the deal.

The software maker's Canadian subsidiary has established a $10 million fund to support technology research and development at Canadian universities. The Microsoft Canada Academic Innovation Alliance was formally launched Wednesday, with a $2.3 million grant to University of Waterloo.

The grant will fund, among other projects, a research program developing a mathematical recognition engine for the Tablet PC, for which Microsoft has developed an operating system.

The grant includes access to other Microsoft technology, such as .Net.

But it's a new class that has caused the stir. As part of the deal, the university will offer a programming course in Microsoft's new C# language. The class will be available online for about 1,500 high school students applying to the electrical and computer engineering department--a first for the university.

The class will also be mandatory for the 300 students per year who are accepted. The new class would replace an existing course that taught C++.

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