yamagatalessig_thumb.jpg
Hiroo and Larry with the hand on the chin "intelligent" look
Had dinner with Lawrence Lessig again. Today Hiroo Yamagata, who is translating has latest book, set up the dinner with our small Japan chapter of CPSR. The guy on the left in the picture is Mr. Yamagata. He worships Bob and is an ordained minister of the church of the sub-genius. He showed us his card today. I really like Yamagata-san, but I first learn about him when he was translating Timothy Leary's book and objected to my writing the forward. Later he made fun of my in his column in Wired Japan. Being the masochist that I am, I hunted him down (Kobahen, the editor of Wired Japan introduced us over drinks) and I THINK we are friends now. Anyway, I'm a big fan of his twisted and intelligent style. (Larry, don't worry, the translation will be fine.)

Part of the discussion was a continuation of last night's discussion. Why aren't Japanese active? (As in "activists") Listening to the other CPRS folks talk about this made me think that maybe it was a bigger issue than I thought. There are many intelligent people who don't feel like making a big deal about stuff. How can you be AWAKE and still bear not to say anything? Reminds me of The Matrix

1 Comment

Japanese strongly support democracy and market economy. Because democracy requires activism, we would think Japanese would be more active on the issues.
In my opinion, low activism in Japan comes from the facts:1).that most Japanese support democracy because they believe democracy and market economy are essential to Japanese economy and the welfare of the people and 2).that support of democracy in Japan does not have deep-rooted commitment to free society, independent individual, and equal right, which are the basis for the democratic society. Welfare is the most important value in Japan. Majority of Japanese establishnent believes stable society is important to their welfare and, therefore, activism becomes their second order priority or undisirable activities.

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