I just finished version 1.3 of the emergent democracy paper. I think this will be my final revision for now and I will focus on new work. This revision includes edits from Chris Case (Thanks Chris!), softening of my stance on a variety of issues vis a vis direct/representative democracy, the point that these tools can enable bad things as well as good things, addition of quotes from Dee Hock's email, re-write of the conclusion to make it clear that we are focusing on the tools for now to try to create some examples, and admitting that we needed to address the necessity to cause action and that this paper was focused primarily democratic dialog/debate. Left the ant stuff in although that seems to be an issue. I tried to add a bit after the weblog part so that it sounded more like weblogs being similar to ants rather than human beings being similar to ants.

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Typo in Conclusion (version 1.3)

We most protect the ability of these tools ...

'most' should be 'must'

Ack! Thanks!

Discussions, deliberations, votes, no matter how elegant the theories, none of are adequate for governance.

Without operational notions of individual and collective consent, rights, and authority, there may be little foundation for implementation beyond engaging forms of discussion, deliberation and possibly recorded judgement of some sort.

The quality of collective wisdom of the Internet multitudes is not proven in any case. Access and time to blog is not quite wisdom.

Chuck, I guess I would agree with everything you say. I guess I would just say that discussions, deliberations, votes and theories are essential components of democracy. Of course we need to work on other things as well, but I think even just discussions, deliberations, votes and theories are an worthy pursuit for those of us who are interested in this.

If the quality of the collective wisdom of the Internet multitudes were proven and access and time to blog were wisdom, there wouldn't be anything left to discuss, would there? Isn't that the point? Isn't that the question? No, it's not proven. No, it won't be proven soon. The question is, is there a possibility? For those of us who believe and hope there is, the next question is, what can we do to encourage it.

As for implementation... I have a totally different track in my life, which is trying to disrupt the power structure and change Japan. This project is very detailed and involved and very specific to Japan. It has nothing, at this point, to do with blogging and everything to do with politics and execution. Running my firm and managing my relationship with power in Japan is my "day job."

It is these parts of my life that I strive to eventually combine into one activity.

I got a call from a journalist in Brazil who wanted to interview me about several different things, one of which was "what do you think of the "emergent democracy" essay that Joi Ito has been circulating online?"

Interesting. No "J"ournalists have contacted ME about the paper. ;-)

So, what what are you going to say Howard?

No Chinese journalism dare to interview Joi in public media on this topic, but we can Meme it in our blogs, thus we could execute Emergent Democracy in such country.

Recommend submit for publication in The Nation.

I enjoyed reading your article on "Emergent Democracy." I have some extended questions which I posted in March 15th entry to my weblog. My questions revolve around wanting to see specific illustrations, the need to integrate online and face-to-face democratic experiments, how to thwart the co-option of power bloggers and the development of online trust that truly replicates trust in the real world.

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