Finally got a chance to talk to Dan about his new book and the future of journalism over lunch. We talked about what journalism really was. My thought was that journalism is defined in the constitution and is a part of democracy. Dan's notion is that the Net and blogging is changing the nature of journalism which in turn has a huge impact on society and democracy. This huge impact is one of the missing parts of my/our emergent democracy paper. Dan's going to focus on journalism, but obviously recognizes the connection with democracy.

We tried to deconstruct what traditional media was. My thought was that the founding father defined "the press" as individuals and small groups with printing presses to represent the voice of the people and that currently, newspapers are just printing machine owners and paper distributors just like telephone companies are a bunch of telephone poles and pipes. Dan asserted that there was more to it. He explained that the protection from lawsuits is an very real risk to journalists and that media companies protect their journalist from such suits. I can see that. Relates to the discussion about the Creative Commons license.

We talked about reputation a lot and about technorati. Nob Seki, follows up the discussion on his blog and discusses the notion of Trusted TrackBacks and the relationship between the interviewer and interviewee.

6 Comments

I'm starting development of the idea this weekend!

I agree that reinventing democracy includes reinventing media and journalism.

You might find my piece on open publishing interesting. It talks about what the internet can do to make journalism more relevant and accessible for global citizens. I wrote it before I really caught onto blogging, but I have been thinking about a blog-like upgrade to open publishing called open editing.

Here is the punchline for open publishing:

Open publishing means that the process of creating news is transparent to the readers. They can contribute a story and see it instantly appear in the pool of stories publicly available. Those stories are filtered as little as possible to help the readers find the stories they want. Readers can see editorial decisions being made by others. They can see how to get involved and help make editorial decisions. If they can think of a better way for the software to help shape editorial decisions, they can copy the software because it is free and change it and start their own site. If they want to redistribute the news, they can, preferably on an open publishing site.

whati believe what will happen to journalism in the future is that there will be more options to finding the news. When people dont have the acess of the internet or even the newspaper, there will be so many more ways than that....like you can find it on your watches almost like you would on your cell phone. Also, i believe that our technology of finding information for the news would take less time to get it out in the open. Enstead of it taking about and hour or two, things will get to the source in about maybe a twenty minutes or less. I truely belive that things in the next decade or even centry will advance so much that there will be less work needed to be done in order to get it out to the people the news would effect the most.

I am sending this you for my bright future in journalism.

Although it has no constitutional function, the press has long had an important role to play in the American system of government. Often called The Fourth Estate, the press (now more often called "the media") is promoted in civics classes and in their own words as conducting a watchdog function over government. The cases of Watergate and Vietnam are often pointed to as examples of the media performing this role, and there are numerous examples of this at the state and local levels. However, this century has witnessed an evolving intimate, even symbiotic, relationship between the media and government, at least at the national level. From the Hearst newspaper chain's active promotion of the Spanish-American War through the often breathless trumpeting of the Gulf War by many

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Trusted Trackback (2) : simplest case from Sync A World You Want To Explore
May 24, 2003 8:46 PM

I've been thinking of the role of the trackback since I mentioned about the idea of Trusted Trackback. Let's start with the role of the trackback. Imagine trackbacks between weblogs, not entries. A trackback is like asking an appointment without... Read More

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Trusted Trackback (2) : simplest case from Sync A World You Want To Explore
April 13, 2004 12:13 AM

I've been thinking of the role of the trackback since I mentioned about the idea of Trusted Trackback. Let's start with the role of the trackback. Imagine trackbacks between weblogs, not entries. A trackback is like asking an appointment without... Read More

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