So I just moved (actually Yusuf moved) my address book to an LDAP server. I thought it would be really cool until I realized that Address Book for the Mac SAYS it does LDAP, and it sort of does, but it doesn't do authentication. Blah. PLEASE PLEASE make address book smarter if you're going to make it the centerpiece of PIM on the Mac. Right now it's slow, doesn't LDAP properly and because Mail accesses it every time I send email, it makes me wait after every single email I send while I wait for address book to update.

I'm almost inclined to go use Entourage if Apple doesn't fix this.

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I'm thinking of doing the very same thing at the moment - moving to Entourage that is. I've checked out several alternative email clients to Mail.app like Gyaz Mail and none come close to the simplicity. Entourage is anything but simple, but at least seems to be a more solid proposition...

I'm thinking of doing the very same thing at the moment - moving to Entourage that is. I've checked out several alternative email clients to Mail.app like Gyaz Mail and none come close to the simplicity. Entourage is anything but simple, but at least seems to be a more solid proposition...

Do the indexes set up in your LDAP directory cover all the queries -- e.g. firstname, surname etc.-- which your LDAP client might request?

Sometimes slow LDAP response times can be explained by the full database searches triggered by the absence of an index that is usable for a particular type of query.

As for the security aspects, a temporary fix might be to configure an SSH tunnel gateway so that you don't have to leave your directory server accessible to unauthenticated users. Let's hope Apple add soon the option to authenticate LDAP sessions even for generic read-only queries...

God, I'm starting to sound more and more like a nerd...

I'm waiting for the updated 15" Powerbook before I Switch. I'm switching from Eudora on the PC, and I finally found some great software, Emailchemy, for moving email from the PC to Mac OSX.

So I emailed the author of that software, Matt Hovey, who's obviously pretty serious about email, to find out if he is satisfied with Mail.app on OSX (his preferred platform at the moment) and he told me that it does what he needs it to do. I was ready to go with Eudora on OSX, but now I am not so sure.

I'm gonna have to chime in with my $0.02 on Entourage. Some of the nicest features are the ability not only to flag emails, but silhouettes of flags propagate up parent folders when the tree is collapsed -- Mail.app doesn't do this. Entourage's ability to keep track of all reply histories is also very impressive -- makes keeping track of what you said and how long ago very convenient. plus, the ability to multi-categorize emails makes sorting and searching a breeze. as much as i'm not a big fan of MS products, the OSX team is a different breed.

Joi, you almost make it sound like Entourage is ::shudder:: evil due to its affiliation with the evil empire. Entourage is very cool, especially for a version 2.0 product (the X moniker notwithstanding, Entourage didn't exist before Office 2001 for mac). Bear in mind that most MS products aren't even usable before version 3, and Entourage's age is even more impressive. Mail is a good product, especially considering that it's "free" (free, except for the fact that you have to buy a mac to get it), and its junk mail filter is unbelievably easy to use, but it lacks the robustness and features of entourage (iCal doesn't exactly approach Entourage in terms of features yet, either).

I use to use Entourage, but it's recurring habit of just refusing to send mail finally got me mad enough to switch. Now I use and enjoy Gyaz, which has the most flexible UI ever.

For the record, I'm getting very slow LDAP response times with Entourage since upgrading to Office 2004 (Entourage 11.2.1). Searching my university's LDAP directory in the Entourage address book used to return almost instantaneous results. Now it takes about 20-30 seconds.

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