I just received an email from one of my best friends urging me to stop fueling disinformation and anti-Americanism. He also urged me to stop comparing the US to Nazi Germany. I've also had some private email exchanges with some conservatives about some of the issues I've written about lately. I've started feeling like a politician trying to keep my liberal and conservative friend happy by mostly posting questions, posting notes of other people's comments and quoting people. Now that I'm being urged from both sides, I guess I should clarify my own position.

Here is where I stand. What I'm mainly against is the conservative media in the US and the right wing one-liners like "bomb Iraq to democracy" which I saw on a lot of conservative web sites before the invasion of Iraq. I remember very clearly Colin Powell's speech at the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos. I was moved by the speech. He made me feel like maybe it was the right decision to go into Iraq... but he hung his whole argument on WMD. I still have not been convinced that the invasion on Iraq was the right decision, but I'm probably willing to hear arguments more than my more liberal friends.

What disturbs me the most about this administration is the drift towards secrecy, the Patriot Act and profiling with the assistance of advanced technology. I think that is REALLY BAD and I am not convinced that profiling really works.

Regarding my quote of Pastor Martin Niemöller... I'm not comparing the US to Nazi Germany. It's an eloquent statement about the necessity to look out for human rights, even those of people who are not in your tribe. I think human rights are at risk globally. It's easy to see abuses and say things about human rights abuses in other countries, but I'm just urging American to watch out for the stuff happening right under your noses.

Although I am a liberal, I find some of the anti-American stuff a bit over-board and I find some of the conservatives arguing convincingly on many issues. I may become emotional at times, but I'm trying to keep my thinking above the emotional level. I will try to present what I believe is a balanced view here and I want to thank all of the people who have posted here and sent me thoughtful disagreements and urgings. (Although some of the disagreements have been not-so-thoughtful.)

48 Comments

Joi, apparently there's a long history behind repeating these same mistakes, over and over again. Read the comments from Hermann Goering, during the Nuremberg trials in 1946.

http://geocities.com/warmarketing/

It's strange how you would have people unhappy with your comments on America, as I have found every one them to be a fairly accurate reflection of the current reality. I also find it refreshing that someone with your influence is willing to state those opionions openly and publicly.

As for the secrecy our government has fallen into, this is a bad sign as the government is supposed to be working for the people. Hiding its actions behind "national security" is merely a smoke screen for the rich and powerful to escape accountability. This is so obvious now as to escape hyperbole.

Perhaps this is why I now question how I could have ever considered them to be conveyors of intelligent rebuke during the Clinton years.

Joi,

Thanks for the clarification. I think it was not just the Niemöller quote, the emotional tone of some recent posts could lead people on either side of the issue to conclude that you were/are "anti-american".

"It's strange how you would have people unhappy with your comments on America, as I have found every one them to be a fairly accurate reflection of the current reality."

ditto.

I've said this before, but I'm not anti-American. I'm anti-stupidty.

Sadly, many people believe that holding the United States to its ideals is Anti-American. The price of freedom is eternal vigilance. Keep fighting the good fight!

What Peter said. As an American, I want to be proud of the actions of our government. That can't always be true, but when the government shows so many worrisome signs... at the very least it's cause for criticism.

Without criticism, how can there be improvement.

Part of the frustration now is once we've gotten ourselves into a mess, how do we get ourselves out without making htings worse. There's a lot of confusion over that problem, among both people who supported the invasion and people who were against it from the start.

Anyone against criticism of the government must be asked: what else are our freedoms for?

There is a huge difference between being anti-American (or any nation) from the root of nationalism and being against the current policies of any given nation. America is, or was, about questioning authority.

The current policies of my country leave a great deal to be desired. I love America, but I don't love the current administration or what they've done or are doing in my name.

The willful ignorance and disregard by the current administration of the world community and its concerns has gone from embarrassing to appalling.

The atmosphere here has been surreal if not outright frightening to me. Multiple times I have been told by conservatives I have attempted to engage in realistic and intelligent debate "If you don't like it, leave!" and "You *must* support your country and President [no matter what]!" The atmosphere is dangerously divisive and closed-minded.

This isn't democracy nor in the spirit of it. Not even close. This divisive, blind-faith attitude is rapidly sliding into totalitarianism, and it's making me physically sick to think about it.

America does itself an enormous disservice to flippantly ignore any and all calls to inspect and check itself against the yardstick of history. Never does anything repeat itself from history exactly, but it seems to me that enough similarities are there to at least warrant suspicion, caution, and introspection. (A financial depression, a common and identifiable enemy - even as a scapegoat, a grab for power, a supression of the freedoms of speech and press and the detainment of thousands of people without due process.)

Introspection should always be part of the political process to begin with, especially now.

Are we, as a country, so weak that to merely be called names that we can't stop for a moment, take stock, and confirm to ourselves and the world at large that we are not the next Weimarch Republic? Or are we too afraid to even look?

This is not the United States my Grandfather fought for. This is not the United States my Grandfather's brothers and friends fought and died for. Every day my Grandmother watches the news - the broadcast, not really news kind of news - and grows angrier and angrier at the things she sees her country doing.

We have squandered our inheritance, America, and worn out our welcome. And more than ever, we need to be friends to the world.

My apologies to the world. Please help us, and please forgive us.

What concerns me most is that recently (conveniently this always happens near elections), commentaries and posted opinions become so polarized over two words that have no real meaning.
If you consider yourself a liberal, do you look at things from people who declare themselves conservatives with more skepticism? If you are a conservative, do you automatically drown out comments from "liberal" media? What ever happened to common sense? Whatever happened to "question everything"? A good idea is a good idea regardless of who the originator voted for in the last presidetial election. A bad policy created by a candidate from an "enlightened" party is still going to have negative ramifications.
Joi, for your friends who find your comments may be coming from the wrong side of the fence, I would advise them to truly try and identify what that fence really represents. In the end, the difference between conservatives and liberals should not be so great. Or can we just call this political bigotry and go on with out devolution.

Joi, I think your post was very eloquent. There is an interesting cluster of psychological symptoms that I find is an excellent predictor of soon-to-be 'dangerous' governments and government leaders. All of the worst leaders of, and the worst governments the world has known show strong indicators of narcissistic personality disorder.

It can truly be said that narcissism, in excess is at the heart of evil. I have lots of examples to back that up, if anyone is interested.

In both governments and people, the most obvious symptoms of narcissistic tendancies are inability to ever admit a mistake, persistent grandiosity combined with a marked lack of concern for others, especially the 'average person' (narcissists hold the masses in contempt) dishonesty and many more.

Those kinds of root psychological problems are at the root of the aspects of the current administration that scare me. Unfortunately, those tendencies are fairly common. Both the Reagan and first Bush administration were pretty much the same. With bad consequences to how the US was seen in the world, IMO. We are paying for some of those mistakes now in the way we are seen internationally and although I have many conservatives I count among my friends, I think most of them are in denial about the aspects of these previous and current administrations that bother people like me.

It's sad. But they are still good people and we can find common ground easily if we look. The biggest difference between us, I think, is that I tend to lean towards believing that society is an oligarchy, and they feel it is a meritocracy.

I think where someone falls on that debate is a good predictor of one's politics on economic issues, at least.. :)

But there are good people everywhere, on both sides of the aisle, so to speak. We have to try not to pigeonhole people.

I think the difference between good and bad people of all political stripes is that the good ones want to keep the lines of communication open while the bad ones clearly TRY to polarize and denigrate .. Also, the good folks have ethics they keep while the bad ones always feel that 'the ends justify the means'

Does that resonate with anybody?

What is wrong with being anti-American? Is that like being an enemy or having an uncurable disease? I don't think so. It's just people who doesn't like America, people who attack America with their mouth which unfortunately means they can't be shot or bombed in the name of free and secure world. Dang.

But I don't think Joi quality as an anti-American. Stupid kids in Korea who burnt American flags are anti-American, but Joi hasn't burnt enough American flags to qualify as an anti-American.

But then every American like me reserve the right to call anyone anti-American just for the hell of it. After all, it's nice to be a citizen of the most powerful nation in the world. Accuse people of being anti-American and watch them squirm. How dare they admire Britney Spears' breasts and hate America at the same time?

I say Ishihara is anti-American and I want to burn his underwear!

Don Park,

I'm with you. I want to burn Ishihara's underwear as well.

Joi,

Come to think of it, you never sounded "anti american" as much as "pro crying wolf" (or some such). Please do say what you want to say, clearly and at the top of your lungs! Fortunately the kempeitei are not around to silence you any more.

I'm anti-american... and an American at the same time ... go figure ;)

It's possible to love America but hate the US govt.

Just be anti-US-government.

Bush is a liar, a coward, a traitor, and a thief... any sane country would have impeached him a LONG time ago.

Good to know he wasn't elected in the first place.

I don't see how it is wrong to be anti-anything if you have good reasons for being so. If using facts to prove what the US government is doing is blatantly wrong is considered anti-american, then I'm sure everyone has done that at some point and should be labeled so.

Yes, it is wrong to hate something just for the hell of it, but doing it for a clear reason isn't. All those demonstrators you see burning US flags and effigies are doing it because they have suffered directly or indirectly from the actions of the US government.

Joi, I've found your views to be rational and to the point and I agree with most of them. Keep it up.

I suspect that Joi struggles, as many of us do, to be a decent person in an increasingly polarized and partisan world.

Joi, keep being expressing yourself as you will, without apology. You post some of the best most level headed and insightful commentary I read anywhere and would hate to see you change to appease anyone.

Like many others above I love America and what it stands for but I fear and dislike the current American regime and the hypocrisy of a desire force the spread of democracy while at the same time taking away so many freedoms from it's own citizens.

I'm European but have a number of American friends and an American business partner. I can't tell you how much respect I have for their country and themselves as honest decent people. That's why it sickens me to see the current regime destroying everything that America has represented. Why oh why didn't Gore get into office?

The plain fact remains that this American president has liberated more than 30 million people from two of the most barbaric tyrannies on the planet while his opponents sputter and fulminate about non-existent loss of rights in the US and the fact that the US didn't get permission first from the French and Germans, who were themselves complicitous in the crimes of the Hussein regime.

Every day that the Americans are in Iraq, thirty more innocent Iraqis are not murdered by Saddam's secret police, hundreds more aren't imprisoned, millions more denied basic human rights. What's the matter with you people? Would you have carried on this way against the US war against European fascism? Would you have called FDR a Nazi? Are you, in fact, so inflamed by your anti-Americanism that you now actually support Islamic fascism?

The choices are not gray. On one side, you have the freest, most open society on the planet. On the other you have a bunch of medieval theocratic fascists who would extinguish every hard won right you have. This threat is not a projection, but reality -- where they have had the power, they have pushed walls over on homosexuals, they have stoned women to death for appearing in public with men who are not their husbands, they have removed all rights from girls and women, they have murdered people in cold blood who don't believe in their god, they have mass murdered thousands of innocent civilians.

Every one of your arguments against Bush is turning out to be a lie. No WMDs? Saddam _did_ have ongoing programs to produce weapons of mass destruction. No ties to al Qaeda? Saddam did have _direct_ ties to al Qaeda. No yellowcake from Africa. Saddam _was_ attempting to acquire uranium from Africa. Saddam could be contained. Saddam was acquiring or building rockets that could strike Europe.

All of which is irrelevant. Even if all the professed reasons for the war turn out to be false, the one truth remains: 25 million people have been liberated from psycopathic tyranny. When they write the history books, that is the fact that will focus on, not the charges about the reasons for the war. George Bush, Tony Blair, the Italians, the Spanish, the Poles, the Romanians, and the Iraqis will stand on the right side of history. And you will stand on the wrong side.

Pastor Martin Niemöller was right. First they came for the Aghan women, and I didn't speak out because I was anti-American. Then they came for the Marsh Iraqis, and I did not speak out because I hated Bush. Then they came for the Iranian Bahai, and I did not speak out because I was "pro peace." Then they came for me . . .

Look here for what I consider a good essay on the conservative position.

http://www.ornery.org/essays/warwatch/2003-11-02-1.html

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans
http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0004615.html

How many more Americans will come home in body-bags from Iraq before the "moral majority" will move from indifference, to indignation?

During the Vietnam conflict the limit was 47,410 (the public execution of four "traitor" students at Kent State Uniiversity are not included in this total).

America's Wars: U.S. Casualties and Veterans
http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0004615.html

How many more Americans will come home in body-bags from Iraq before the "moral majority" will move from indifference, to indignation?

During the Vietnam conflict the limit was 47,410 (the public execution of four "traitor" students at Kent State University are not included in this total).

I have no complaints about US invading Iraq because the fear of WMD was enough of a cause for US to attack any country. If this doesn't make sense to you, put yourself in the mind of a recent rape victim with a large gun coming face to face with a leering stranger in an empty parking lot.

What I don't like is the occupation of Iraq and the stink of corruption surrounding the 'rebuilding' of Iraq. Around every one of those 'contracts' are rings of politicians and retired generals and government employees who charge toll-fees.

Iraq owes Hyundai more than a billion dollars, yet there is little chance of them getting their money any time soon because Hyundai is looked upon with scorn by Washington DC for its' business relationship with North Korea.

"I have no complaints about US invading Iraq because the fear of WMD was enough of a cause for US to attack any country. "

Yikes! Are you saying that other countries therefore have cause to attack the US, as well, given that we're one of the select few countries that has actually used WMD on others?

That's a very, very scary sentence.

As one of the "Vietnam" generation, let me say this. I personally feel we did the Vietnamese people no favors by "losing" the war there. The track record of the post-war North Vietnamese government doesn't convince me it was the best for that people. (Let me also say that I am not an expert on Vietnam, nor do I want to become one.)

The track record of the former Iraqi government also speaks for itself, and I think Americans will do that country no favors by withdrawing because of a "body count." I cannot begin to understand the Iraqi people nor can they begin to understand me. I suppose the situation is a standoff from that viewpoint. I'm sure that the longer the Americans are in Iraq, the more they'll wish they were not there. And in the end, the chasm between our countries will be too great to bridge. The U.S. will pull out, and it will take Iraq 20 or 30 years to get its act together. Who knows, it may even become the Cambodia of the Middle East.

It's sad. And I suppose it is our fault. As are most other events on the international scene.

This may be off track but...this IS your web log, isn't it? Where you get to state your opinion, your viewpoint, what you find interesting or disturbing, however you like and with as many contradictions and rants as you like? You know, the free speech thing -- and those who don't like it need not read it? Or are you being loaded with the idea that you are so influential and important that you must speak responsibily because some poor soul in the blogosphere could be persuaded down the "wrong" road by you?

I'm very much in favor of people taking responsibility for what they say. I'm also in favor of people taking responsibility for what they read.

I consider myself intelligent enough to know that this is all your opinion, based on what you know, what you think, and your interpretation of your experience (i.e. this weblog is all about YOU). Thus, I can chose to ignore you, or rebuff you in my own weblog, or any number of other actions that do not infringe upon you. I would not ask you to edit, censor, or "spin" your remarks to please anyone other than you.

Hell, I'm reading this because, well, it's YOU. That's what's interesting.

"my position on the us"

one of the biggest problems seems to be terminology. what you describe is not your position on the us, but your position on the foreign policy of the current republican government.

if that differentiation would always be made, it would also be easier for americans to think more rational about the whole situation.

"Dissent is the highest form of patriotism." - Thomas Jefferson

Here is one from Teddy Rosevelt

"The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else."

It appears that you have some support in the U.S. too.

Stephen, I agree that the sentence I wrote is scary. A country, any country, is a scary when it is in fear of its survival or intoxicated with power. No ideals or advances in civilization will change that. America is not an exception.

Do I expect my fellow Americans to show understanding toward Korean-Americans after North Korea attacks America with a nuke? I think not. We'll be lucky if we don't get rounded up like Japanese Americans did in WW2.

I believe brutality and so called inhumanity is part of human nature.

Will Japan invade Korea if it can get away with it? Definitely. Will Korea attack Japan if it had the strength? Absolutely. Death and destruction might seem far away when immersed in day to day delusions, but they are just around the corner and it doesn't take much for a seemingly sane man to bare its fang out of fear.

Read what the so called X-generations are writing online and you can see the writing on the bare metal.

I just finished watching the speech that President Bush made in Britain yesterday. Yes it was one sided, but it was the side I agree with. President Bush is right. The world is a dangerous place and freedom and democracy is worth fighting for. Japan and Europe are not really freedom loving countries in the sense that the people of the New World are and that is what counts for the visceral anti American press which is just jealousy from where I am sitting. America stands for the hopes and dreams of all free independant and individualistic human beings. Some people will reach this goal and some won`t but the world is a better place when Excellence, Greatness and Freedom are fought for. Who cares whether the US is popular. All that I care about is that when the US has been there to save freedom in the past and will be there again in the future. The US is on the side of all the virtues that make life worth living. Thank your lucky stars for the United States of America.

In China, many people feels disapointed on US's policy, too. People from this long-history country now often likes to compare today's US with China's Qing Dynasty. They are all powerful, poverty and strong-armed. However, they are ignoring the voice and changes from outside world, even from their own grassroots.

As an American and a Jew, I find nothing you have published even close to offensive. In no way have you implied Americanism to be even close to Nazism. Instead, you have articulated thoughts--with which I happen to agree--in thoughtful, useful tones. If I didn't agree with you and if you offended me, I would still embrace your right to express them. One oif the USA's best pieces of works is that first amedment. Keep up the free speech and the thoughtful insight.

As an American and a Jew, I find nothing you have published even close to offensive. In no way have you implied Americanism to be even close to Nazism. Instead, you have articulated thoughts--with which I happen to agree--in thoughtful, useful tones. If I didn't agree with you and if you offended me, I would still embrace your right to express them. One oif the USA's best pieces of works is that first amedment. Keep up the free speech and the thoughtful insight.

As an American and a Jew, I find nothing you have published even close to offensive. In no way have you implied Americanism to be even close to Nazism. Instead, you have articulated thoughts--with which I happen to agree--in thoughtful, useful tones. If I didn't agree with you and if you offended me, I would still embrace your right to express them. One oif the USA's best pieces of works is that first amedment. Keep up the free speech and the thoughtful insight.

"The world is a dangerous place and freedom and democracy is worth fighting for"

no doubt about that. what we're discussing are the means in that fight. the conquest of a country against the vote of the UN can't be the way of the 21st century.

If the US wanted to do something for peace and democratization in the middle east and security at home, they should just solve the palestine problem, which they undoubtedly could, if they used their influence on israel.

in this context if find the thread on kuroshin about clintons terror-policy quite interesting:
http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2003/10/30/135644/95

i'm on your side with your opinions and your position. however, i do take issue with your saying you're trying to stay above the emotional level. let's face it -- war is a very emotional subject, as it involves your core morality. the moment you've become "objective" about war is the moment that you've lost yourself to the possibility of it happening. i personally am very emotional about the war and hope to remain so...

Joi, your passionate commitment to democracy and openness is apparent, and whatever criticism you're getting is more an indication of the degree to which we're polarized in the U.S. and elsewhere. This polarization results, I think, from the evolution many of us are trying to sort out, from competitive and combative traditions wherein power was centralized and social organization was hierarchical to collaboration, cooperation, decentralization, and more equitable distributions of power that emerge from pervasive networked communications technologies and our (relatively) new perspective of the earth as a whole with less emphasis on borders and barriers. Getting there is tough, there's an inherent backlash, an attempt to find a way back to concepts of power and dominance that seem corrupt to some, but are still embraced by many others.

Anyway, thanks for this post, and thanks for all the great work you're doing, reaching across those borders I mentioned.

Thanks for all of the great comments.

Michael. I agree that it's impossible not to be emotional, but emotion clouds debate. I think emotions tend to be behind a lot of the corrosive elements of society such as racism as well. I think that when we are talking about such a complex and already emotional charged issue, it is important to try to focus our discussion on trying to establish (the ever elusive) facts and filter out emotional outbursts.

Having said that, I will reserve the right to be emotional at times on this issue and much more emotional/passionate on other issues.

Racism. Actually, having been raised in South Georgia, I know a bit about this...and I would say that when racism is "objectively" assessed (can you say eugenics?), when it is "intellectualized", it is more evil than any emotional outburst.

As applied to war, I feel the same way. War College? Objectivity in killing, in invading another country, in believing in "might is right", is inherently evil. We need to confront this issue emotionally.

But, I understand and appreciat your points. Thanks.



Interesting point. I think it's the difference between being passionate about your logic or logical about your emotions. ;-) I agree that wrapping racism and other things in a veil of logic is very dangerous and as you say, de-humanizing things like killing is also very risky.

I'm a Brit, and, like most Brits, I'm not anti-American. But, it is not surprising that there have been such large protests against Bush in London, when, amongst other things, 9 British citizens are being held at Camp X-Ray without being charged. Imagine if 9 US Citizens were being held on the Isle of Wight under the same circumstances.

I don't mind Brits being arrested by the US, but they _must_ be tried fairly, and so far, after 2 years in Guantanamo Bay, that has not happened.

The following statement states america's position regarding iraq and the war on terror best I think.

He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche

America has had the unique postion in the past to check it's own behavior through our various institutions. It is at once our greatest strength and our greatest weakness. It is up to each and every individual to keep one eye on his ideals and the other on his government, lest both get away. Have you spoken up for what you believe in yet? If not, let it be heard.

The following statement sums up America's position regarding Iraq and the war on terror best I think.

He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche

America has had the unique postion in the past to check it's own behavior through our various institutions. It is at once our greatest strength and our greatest weakness. It is up to each and every individual to keep one eye on his ideals and the other on his government, lest both get away. Have you spoken up for what you believe in yet? If not, let it be heard. Otherwise our leaders will make us the monster in the process and we will find the abyss staring back at us and consuming us all at once.

I consider myself someone who loves my country, but I don't trust some of the leaders - Bush and his gang are particularly frightening.

I managed to get quite a bit of hate mail from rightwingers for this post.

Too bad there was so little substance in this discussion. Which incidents or which clauses in the Patriot Act specifically impinge on freedom? How are these measures as effective steps against real threats measured against potential or actual abuse of power?

What is the history of erroding rights and creeping Fascism in the U.S. and other countries? How are domestic rights fairing under the War on Terror compared to wars in the past? The Civil War, WWI, WWII etc. What about increasing surveillance and law enforcement measures from the "Drug War"?

Overall, you are correct to be concerned but the comparisons to Nazi German over dramatized cries of quashed dissent are hyperbole and have the opposite effect of discrediting such concerns ("crying wolf") while trivializing the actual history of Nazi Germany.

Who are you people? I'm an academic type and your topics interest me, but I can't tell what you guys are about - are you digerati?

Lynne

No one should be labeled of being anti-American for simply using a right pioneered by the same nation: freedom of speech.

How can a current culture be so wrong?

I am sure that in our history there were masses that believed their perspective was as righteous as those against gay marriage. Perhaps the historian can render the specific count of the hundred, or thousand or even millions of individuals that were against a newly developing aspect of society, believing that theirs was the correct thinking and that even God would approve of their internal hate and anger, external gestures of violence and non-verbal commitment to their perspective.

The Passion movie depicts how a culture faced with a new perspective goes wrong. Unfortunately, the masses have gone wrong many times before as we recollect what were have learned in terms of slavery, Nazism, and equal rights for people of color and women. At this time, the leader of the most powerful nation in the world has taken steps to reduce the aspects of the Constitution in accordance with current culture. He wanted to produce a conflict in the founding document of this country. Like the masses who, in the time of Jesus, he holds fast to “words” of a doctrine instead of realizing the “contents and concepts” of those words from that doctrine. How sad that subsets of these masses were once, themselves, faced with the similar biases and roadblocks to their actualization.

Many people are afraid to speak out about the fact that history is again repeating itself because of fear. However, isn’t it the same fear that held back those who were against the masses, which if we think about it now were not that formidable, in past episodes of rebellion to “maintain status quo” and prevent new information, new knowledge and new perspective inside their sealed minds. Where are the scholars to enlighten the masses? Or perhaps scholars and peace keepers only surface after the supreme evil and wrongfulness’ have passed? Perhaps is it because the clergy have been wrong so many times in the past regarding their human interpretations of how the Divine desires an outcome? Or perhaps it’s because the writes and journalists have been wrong in explaining and presenting the facts to masses and masses of individuals, creating hysteria and emotional strife that all is silent now?

At times of change, there are a few who respond rather than react to the chaos around them and do clearly see the current cultural path as wrong. These special individuals have written monumental books, given time honored speeches, preached from the pulpit, and even now created a movie just in time to enlighten the world to the same time honored message of acceptance, love and the necessity of embodying that what is different about you. Hurt and hatefulness in any form, towards any goal, from any perspective is wrong, and when combined with attempts to make others in your image of what is just, is practicing the Divine. When in the past of this world has those practicing the Divine ever been fruitful? How can the current culture be so wrong?

JamesAngelo Campistrous

JamesAngelo Campistrous
well i´d like know where came ur last name (Campistrous), i think we are the same family but my grandmother live in tarbes french and i like to know the history of my family if u know.
thanks
shiatso campistrous
from brazil

History will show that you were overanalyizing when you stated your position on this issue. The clusterfu**k America is in will happen when you have a President with a five watt cranial capacity. Sorry if that was too emotionally charged.

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Quando Joi Ito critica uma pol Read More

There you go. While invading countries with your infantry, no talking. Specially good in these times of restricted speech. What... Read More

I've been visiting some weblogs lately where the discussion ranges about the ominous similarity between the Bush administration's use of PR and spin doctoring and the Nazi's use of the same before the WWII -- with some implications of the awful consequ... Read More

American feeling from The Scroll of Emptiness
November 24, 2003 8:55 AM

Joi Ito has recently been accused of anti-Americanism - in this posting he clarifies his thoughts on the subject. Much like Joi, I'm not a Read More

with the inauguration out of the way, i thought i'd take a little time to ponder one of the writings of one john perry barlow. yes. governor schwarzenegger. i said it. It's time for the experientialists - those of us... Read More

Google Nuking? from Tech-Weblog by Christoph C. Cemper
December 27, 2003 9:12 AM

Blogdiva has a call to Google Nuking in here post in c u l t u r e k i t c h e n: What is wrong with this picture? concerning phentermine spammers (illegal medicine sellers or so...) The... Read More

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