I spent last month so excited by my Nokia 6600. Land in a random city, flip open my PowerBook, click, "connect" and I was immediately online via bluetooth, gprs and my T-Mobile roaming. Internet everywhere. It was sooo cool... until I got my bill. $3500 for one month of mobile abandon. At $3500 / month, I would say that it works, "technically" but is totally unacceptable socially and economically. It's like having a PowerBook stolen from the carriers and being beaten over the head with the stupid stick. It reminds me of the "good old days" of x.25. What's the point of broadband wireless unless people can afford it. This trip I'm hunting down the free wifi and only using grps when absolutely necessary.

NOTE TO CARRIERS: Make gprs cheap, flat fee and with free roaming or else... or else... you suck and I'm going to take my marbles and go play on 802.11.

UPDATE: I just got a Sonera account so I don't have to roam in Finland. It's about $20 for up to 100MB.

49 Comments

A small utility on your powerbook would be useful - a meter to tell you the total cost being racked up when you are connected this way.

god I miss Ricochet...

Back then $70 a month seemed so expensive for unlimited wireless broadband in every major US city. Now it sounds like a ridiculous bargain.

When I read you were using the 6600 everywhere, knowing the price you pay for GPRS in Germany, I was actually wondering that you must have a very high phone bill indeed to be so happy about all of that. I pay 10 EURs for 5MB included per month, which is fine for a bit of eMail, Moblogging and IM.

$3500 is still a bit above what I would have expected though. There must be a good charge on top of that standard bill there. But then again, roaming with GPRS is still very expensive, which I learned when Moblogging from the UK, sending small posts for something like a EUR the post :)

But it does point out that there is a reason to look out for free WiFi hotspots.

London Paddington has one which allows you to sign-in as guest for example. Very nice. I presume it doesn't work too many times though, maybe based on MAC address of your nocat card.

For US$3500 I can live for four and a half months in a capital city of a first world country. That is rent by myself in a four room upstairs apartment with views, electricity, water, telephone, adsl internet and food. Also I average buying one second-hand book per day and have done for years. On the other hand I don't run a car and I don't eat at restaurants. Perhaps this comparison is of interest? A month of GPRS sounds expensive.

I didn't even turn on the GPRS service with Rogers AT&T here in Canada (I'm in Montreal) for the first year I had my Treo 270 for just that reason. It's simply too expensive for even a small amount of bandwidth per month, and it seems the service provider relies on the fact that a) people who sign up for the service are probably expensing it, so they probably don't care that much and b) it's so easy to go over the threshold and get into per-MB fees.

Trouble is that many, even most, of the early adopters probably aren't working for companies that will underwrite their data service. Yet again this differential business pricing makes a service that should catch on very quickly much slower to get into the mainstream.

Stephen, care to let us all know which city that is?

You always have to use tracking software and try to avoid GPRS roaming. My Nokia D211 software can show every transfered kilo-byte in detail...

But again, it's GRPS roaming.

I pay Euro ~50 per month for ~50 MB and never had my bills overrun -- because I track down every byte and even think in 100k/250k billing blocks.

$3500 for GPRS is ridiculous. I've lived from September with that money in my student flat :)(it's a first world country but in no way a capital of any sort).

Joi, have you looked into roaming in Europe with that Sonera card? The rates are quite economical, the last time I looked at them. Depends on course the distribution of usage etc.

In the US, t-mobile offers unlimited data GPRS connections for $20/month. I just enabled it on my phone for same wireless everywhere experience with my 12" powerbook.

802.11 has got to be there somewhere? Are you running MacStumbler? You'll find the 802.11 signals nearly everywhere. Sometimes I flip my Powerbook on in the car and drive around, going from 1 or 2 signals a mile (in London) to about 30 a block (Palo Alto). Doesn't take too long.

Or you can get a stumbler program for a 802.11 palm and then just walk around with it in your pocket, noting the access points.

I gave up on my T-mobile->bluetooth->solution after a similiar problem with billing.

for $3500, couldn't you just have someone follow you around with a really big spool of cat5?

I think you could probably haggle that bill down a bit Joi... Worth a try maybe... You're obviously a high-value customer and if you let them know how astonished you are about it, then maybe they'll try to soften the blow and bet on your valued future custom... I've managed to do that with overseas phone costs with UK operators before

Some wireless geeks have told methat you can get unlimited GPRS for $5 a month through T-Mobile--that is if you don't need many ports. It's called T-Zones unlimited. For $10 you get more ports. For $20, as it has been stated, you get them all.

You can always log onto the website to see if it's costing you.

Also, T-Mobile announced that it will be bundling all its data services together so you can get WiFi where possible, and something slower where it's not. I think Euro roaming will be a part.

I'm debating posting this on MobileTracker. Such a good example of what to watch out for. Just be glad you *can* pay it.

Jeez, Joi, didn't you look into the billing system before you began to use it? I thought my 70,000 yen NTT bill when my modem went haywire and made 1-second connections every five seconds one month (during metered billing days) was high.

As for living on $3,500 for four or five months, you could almost do that in Tokyo, although not in a 4-room apartment (however, a 4-room rental house out in east Tokyo--Okutama or Itsukaichi--might work). You couldn't pay the national pension, ward tax, the NHK bill, your life insurance; fund your IRA; or buy medicine if you're sick; but you could live on 80,000 yen a month if you tried: 35,000 for rent, 20,000 for food, 15,000 for utilities, 10,000 for household expenses and miscellaneous.

Tabby, you forgot to get rid of all pets and children, cancel Wowow, get rid of satellite tv, walk to your destinations on your days off, and eat onigiri everyday.

Joi: your bill is what I make a month. Maybe I could carry that spool of CAT-5 that was mentioned earlier. Give me a call if you are interested.

and I'm still trying to getting my Z600 talking GPRS with my iBook .... hmmm ... maybe I should stop that. Let us know if you strike any good deals on GPRS (in Europe in my case :))

iM, yeah, no kids and pets. No cable either: is that a necessity these days? I guess I forgot the riding lawnmower too.

I wouldn't eat onigiri myself. The way I'd go would be menus like a grilled fish (sanma are 77 yen), some veggies (moyashi for 25 yen, snow peas for 85 (enough for two meals), a half a kabocha for 99), tofu with ginger, maybe a navel orange (70 yen); or maybe spaghetti (150 grams, maybe 35 yen) with sauce made from an ounce of olive oil, a garlic clove, and 2 overripe, almost spoiled tomatoes from the bargain cart (overripe ones make the best sauce), with maitake. Breakfast would be bananas some days. I could do chili with canned kidney beans, cumin, and cayenne pepper from the 100 yen shop, a can of tomatoes (100 yen), an onion, and ground pork. A bagette from the bakery plus any number of fillings is yummy.

It would be challenging, but you'd probably be able to eat more healthily on 350 yen a meal than by buying more expensive crap. And yes, you'd be getting exercise by walking to the shops and comparing prices.

T-Mobile is pretty reasonable in the US. I was very stupid for not looking at the roaming fees. I figured that I'd trying using it for a month "normally" and see how much it cost. I had no idea I would rack up such a bill. $3500 is a lot for me too. If I had an "extra" $3500, I'd rather donate it to EFF than give it to the carriers.

Does anyone know of a service that tracks your fees when you're roaming abroad?

I think what I'm going to have to do is get local service in countries where I travel a lot and keep my T-Mobile for voice so at least I can have one phone number. It just bursts my dream because I had just cancelled my GSM service that I had in Switzerland and Spain thinking I could have us the US T-Mobile and be done with it.

Before I got my sprint data access, I would take the same approach of local accounts for internet service as well. After arriving in a new town for the week, I would open up the phone book and start calling ISPs asking about getting an internet account for a week. Half would just hang up on me, but eventually I would get someone that would charge me $5-10 for connection.

One time, in Phoenix, I was on my fourth or fifth call, and I got a small ISP (I was talking to the owner). After I explained what I wanted, and convinced him that I was competent enough to connect up myself, he just gave me an account on the spot (phone number, username, password), and told me to send him "some dollars" if I got around to it. The service was great, and I sent him a check when I got home.

I know it's a little off-topic, but Tabby is right. You can live in Tokyo on $800 / month. I do it, and I eat healthier than anyone I know. Always have the freshest veggies from the organic farmers co-op, huge variety of beans, the healthiest brown-rice, etc...

Live in a great neighborhood in a great apartment overlooking a river with no big roads within 800 meters.

No cable of course, but I rent videos every once in a while. (I tried a free month of cable in January and found it was all crap)

No kids, but two great pets. Within bike-riding distance of any shops I may need, about 30 minutes by bike to Shinjyuku / Shibuya.

I compare my standard of living to people I know who spend so much more and only feel pitty for them. Basically, even if I *want* to spend more money, I find it hard to find anyhting I need to raise that standard. Most of the big expenses (such as cable boob-tube, or proccesed conbini/restaurant food) actually lower the standard.

-Just my two cents about how it is possible to live for several months with $3500 even in Tokyo. ;)

No cable either: is that a necessity these days?

Tabby: You try convincing two teenagers and one preteen daughter that SkyPerfectv is not a necessity. Go ahead, I dare you.

Kevin: You must pay next to nothing for rent if you can live off of 80,000 yen or so a month. Do you live in government housing? If not, what the heck are your living conditions like?

Once again, I appologize for being off topic, but in answer to iM:

I share an apartment with my significant other, rent is $650 / month. (my share $325 or course)

It has a big 7 tatami living room, a nice 4 tatami kitchen and a 2 tatami bath.

Did I mention it is in a great location? South-facing-sun-in-the-window-all-day
style apartment?

It seems a bit cramped to look at, and we get on each others nerves sometimes, but relative to hours spent together, I'd say that actually happens less than when we lived apart. (the couple who lived here before me had a baby too.)

Considering that most people spend most of their time at work, as she does, (I work from home) there's not really much need for a big place. It also helps that this is an older building. A lot of people will pay a lot more for a smaller, one room apartment because they care about how old the building is. I guess an older building has a bad image...

The fact that we both have little desire to eat out, and prefer our own cooking, saves us big bucks too. Don't believe the prices you see on the US news. Tokyo is not that expensive... so long as you don't shop for your produce in the train station gift-shop.

I guess I left that part about sharing the apartment out in my previous comment :), but the point is, it's possible.

i think the carriers are slowly catching on: vodafone and t-mobile will be coming out with a gprs flatrate in germany this spring. if you are a vodafone business customer you can actually get umts data cards already. but it´s also just technically since they base their charges on the gprs rates. ridiculous. since just that dawned to them, they´re working on the pricing system right now.

e-plus, another german carrier, offers the danger hiptop including a gprs flatrate for 20 euro/month. too bad, the danger doesn´t speak bluetooth and cannot be used as a modem...

oh, btw: ever since i had a bill about half of joi´s i´ve been using a neat little traffic counter for mac os x called "ridge". better keep an exe on that traffic...

Well, the thing about gprs is that: 1. It isn't suitable for multimedia. The cost is just too high, even with a 100 Mb/month deal. 2. GPRS roaming, as with GSM voice roaming is hilariously expensive. Take a lesson from this: one of the wealthiest mobile phone tycoons in Europe is known to never use roaming - he just buys prepaid SIMs whereever he goes. The big advantage of GSM roaming - that you keep your phone number wherever you go - just doesn't apply for GPRS.

Personally, I like the idea of starting a GPRS-only mobile phone company, which would purchase capacity on GSM/3G networks worldwide. It would be a very tight operation with relatively few employees, focused on the needs of the international road-warrior.

OT but: I live in the capitol of a "First World Country" and for the place Stephen described you could live about 2 weeks :-)

Observing the telecom industry provides an endless source of
annoyance. Look e.g. at the extortionate roaming charges levied
by most European operators on customers who use pre-paid cards
-- typically 1 to 1.25 Euro for sending a measly SMS with a
payload of 140 Bytes on a foreign network ! This works out to
a cost of US$9000 per megabyte !!! Granted, nobody uses SMS
packets to exchange serious amounts of data, but still, it
illustrates how the operators are getting away, even in 2004,
with gouging their customers with unbelievably high data charges.

But then again, these telecom operators must somehow recover
from the financial blow the idiotic European governments dealt
them -- i.e. the approx 120 billion Euros levied in 3G spectrum
licenses...
Hey, there's this neat, inventive, job-creating and future-
oriented high-tech sector in which European players are more
than competitive -- e.g. Nokia, Ericsson, Siemens, Gemplus,
Vodafone... Let's just make their financials a bit more distressed
and limit their growth options and value- and job-creating ability
by siphoning off huge amounts of cash from the operators who buy
products and services from them. Surely these operators would
be able to borrow unlimited amounts e.g. from willing banks?
Who cares about the telecom sector anyway? We've got government
budget deficits to fund, for Chrissake !

Stupidity and short-sightedness isn't a European public sector
prerogative, actually. In the private sector, NTT Docomo in
Japan had to write down about 1500 billion yens in dubious
investments in foreign mobile operators like AT&T Wireless
or KPN in the Netherlands. Of course, the irresponsible cretins
in the upper echelons of NTT Docomo who deluded themselves with
the notion that they had a clue about foreign market structure,
company politics and (peakish) stock market trends are still in
charge today, despite the huge damage they inflicted on Docomo...

Wot? Irritated, me ?

Not really full internet access, but does allow xhtml full web browsing via the phone, but O2'S pay-go GPRS is still totally free, my phone has 210mb of download in it's GPRS counter and it has not cost me a single penny.

Not really full internet access, but does allow xhtml full web browsing via the phone, O2'S pay-go GPRS is still totally free, my phone has 210mb of download in it's GPRS counter and it has not cost me a single penny.

GPRS is sweet when you need an easy connection but European rates are extortionate.

I use Vodafone High Speed Data if I need to browse. It feels faster than GPRS and it's certainly less expensive.

My Nokia D211 card shows me the throughput on my connections, so it's easy to cap yourself under a megabyte as you watch the data weight pile on.

I would suggest you ask T-mobile about checking the bill. I got a bill of 1200 Euros last year from T-mobile in Germany. When my company asked for an itemized bill they were not able to collect details on it. I believe billing for GPRS roaming is still not 100% reliable. Give it a try.

Thanks. I will try Vittorio.

One Word AT&T EDGE its a compression update to GPRS that allows for constant data rates of 85-90kbps and bursts at up to 250kbps

$79.99 Flat Rate Free Roaming

Free Roaming? Even international?

german heise found out a way to use gprs data connections for free by pretending to pick up a mms. Picking up a mms the phone establishes a cost free gprs connection, since picking up a mms doesn´t cost anything for the receiver. so by using certain at-commands when establishing the connection between the mobile and the provider´s apn you can establish a cost free data connection between two phones. now all you need is an internet gateway. no problem you connect another gprs-phone with your flatrate-equipped home-pc and configure it as a gateway. voila! you can even be a provider for all your friends. it´s technically not even illegal. more:

http://www.actioncontents.com/archives/001606.html

T-Mobile GPRS unlimited for FREE!

I'm in the US here (Chicago), and recently discovered that T-Mobile was offering what they called as "Free WAP" for all phone plans, even prepaid!

I was using their T-Zones service before for $4.99 a month which gives unlimited GPRS and their T-Zones portal, but now discovered that the $4.99 a month is JUST for their stupid portal and NOT for the GPRS connection.

As for the ports issue:

It seems that ON THE PHONE ONLY, some ports are restricted. Using the phone, I only have access to port 80, and the email ports. But since I have a Bluetooth phone, I was able to connect it to my computer and surf the web from there. T-Mobile thinks that their connection is only used for WAP, but you really can access anything from your laptop. All ports are available when connecting from a real computer. I've tried FTP, VNC, Putty, AIM, everything. It all works.

So DON'T pay $20 dollars a month for unlimited GPRS access. Just cancel that and ask for the "Free WAP" to be activated. As long as you have a voice plan, you get unlimited free GPRS.

Speeds are around 40 kbps for me. I'm hoping to get an EDGE phone soon so I can double that. Good luck everyone.

T-Mobile GPRS unlimited for FREE!

I'm in the US here (Chicago), and recently discovered that T-Mobile was offering what they called as "Free WAP" for all phone plans, even prepaid!

I was using their T-Zones service before for $4.99 a month which gives unlimited GPRS and their T-Zones portal, but now discovered that the $4.99 a month is JUST for their stupid portal and NOT for the GPRS connection.

As for the ports issue:

It seems that ON THE PHONE ONLY, some ports are restricted. Using the phone, I only have access to port 80, and the email ports. But since I have a Bluetooth phone, I was able to connect it to my computer and surf the web from there. T-Mobile thinks that their connection is only used for WAP, but you really can access anything from your laptop. All ports are available when connecting from a real computer. I've tried FTP, VNC, Putty, AIM, everything. It all works.

So DON'T pay $20 dollars a month for unlimited GPRS access. Just cancel that and ask for the "Free WAP" to be activated. As long as you have a voice plan, you get unlimited free GPRS.

Speeds are around 40 kbps for me. I'm hoping to get an EDGE phone soon so I can double that. Good luck everyone.

T-Mobile GPRS unlimited for FREE!

I'm in the US here (Chicago), and recently discovered that T-Mobile was offering what they called as "Free WAP" for all phone plans, even prepaid!

I was using their T-Zones service before for $4.99 a month which gives unlimited GPRS and their T-Zones portal, but now discovered that the $4.99 a month is JUST for their stupid portal and NOT for the GPRS connection.

As for the ports issue:

It seems that ON THE PHONE ONLY, some ports are restricted. Using the phone, I only have access to port 80, and the email ports. But since I have a Bluetooth phone, I was able to connect it to my computer and surf the web from there. T-Mobile thinks that their connection is only used for WAP, but you really can access anything from your laptop. All ports are available when connecting from a real computer. I've tried FTP, VNC, Putty, AIM, everything. It all works.

So DON'T pay $20 dollars a month for unlimited GPRS access. Just cancel that and ask for the "Free WAP" to be activated. As long as you have a voice plan, you get unlimited free GPRS.

Speeds are around 40 kbps for me. I'm hoping to get an EDGE phone soon so I can double that. Good luck everyone.

T-Mobile GPRS unlimited for FREE!

I'm in the US here (Chicago), and recently discovered that T-Mobile was offering what they called as "Free WAP" for all phone plans, even prepaid!

I was using their T-Zones service before for $4.99 a month which gives unlimited GPRS and their T-Zones portal, but now discovered that the $4.99 a month is JUST for their stupid portal and NOT for the GPRS connection.

As for the ports issue:

It seems that ON THE PHONE ONLY, some ports are restricted. Using the phone, I only have access to port 80, and the email ports. But since I have a Bluetooth phone, I was able to connect it to my computer and surf the web from there. T-Mobile thinks that their connection is only used for WAP, but you really can access anything from your laptop. All ports are available when connecting from a real computer. I've tried FTP, VNC, Putty, AIM, everything. It all works.

So DON'T pay $20 dollars a month for unlimited GPRS access. Just cancel that and ask for the "Free WAP" to be activated. As long as you have a voice plan, you get unlimited free GPRS.

Speeds are around 40 kbps for me. I'm hoping to get an EDGE phone soon so I can double that. Good luck everyone.

I think I am in same boat as Joi (except the $3500 bill)...I need to find an INTERNATIONAL option, not just one that works in one country. I'm a technomad, and ideally I'd like to moblog from wherever I am in world. Asking too much?

WOW, what a rip off! I have AT&T EDGE on my Nokia 6820 w/PowerBook G4 17" it runs great I love it! We pay about $ 79 USD per month unlimited, running about 110~130 kbps. I would fight that bill! And tell them were to put it!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)

Joi,

I am a T-Mobile subscriber from Denver. I just spent a month in Sweden. I did email like crazy (approx 40 sent 100 received a day) every day.

Monthly charges: $50.

SECRET SAUCE: Blackberry.

John

Just got a sagem myv65 on vodafone and a tarrif of just 0.73p per kb seemed so innocent but just accessing a few pages with graphics quickly burns through credt

Hey all

I've used gprs for mobile data for a few years now, and its been a right pain ever since - usually a bluetooth mobile and an iPAQ, but would never risk connecting a pc to gprs, the thought of the bills wouldnt let me sleep at night.

Last yr, i was off to Florida for a holiday, from england, and it saved me money to get a T-Mobile phone and data to use as you get a nice big bundle of data to use while roaming at no extra cost compared to the uk, whilst my previous provider asked £30 ($50 approximately) per mb which means if i used all 20mb i estimateded i would for the fortnight in florida it would have cost me about £600 which is more than my entire years contract cost me on t-mobile.

Sadly, T-Mobile arent that reliable and back in the uk the service was down for 1 or 2 days a week on a fairly regular basis. I tried to cancel my contract saying it didnt work reliably, and data was my main need. Their response was a simple, Tough - we dont guarantee it will work - or that you can even make reliable phone calls. I abandoned them in disbelief, giving the handset to my wife to use for the remainder of the time, on a minimal tarrif.

Just my two peneth

Steve

Sorry about the $3500, it's a bit confusing, I'm with ATT-Cingular, and just started using bluetooth with my Nokia and a powermac, I didin't really do the math, I think it's .01 cents per kilobite, which was about a $300 bill for checking my email every other day. They wouldn't adjust the bill even after agreeing to sign up for unlimited data at $25.00 per month, The edge card sounds like the way to go, I'm mobile most of the time, Hotel Wifi is about $10.00 per day, and wifi at the RV parks I live at are about $40 per month, it all adds up, there's got to be a better system out there.
Cingular says they'll give unlimited data with a blackberry, but the screen's too small.

John

They probably give you unlimited data BECAUSE the screen is too small. ;-)

My experience with FiDO
A couple of month ago, we get the latest Qtek 9100 cell phone. We activate GPRS with a basic plan. Well... I wish i had found all this blogs before... A whopping $300 CDN/month. After discussion with FIDO, they couldn't care less about the bill.
1) They won't tell you that you will easily bust your basic transfer quota.
2) Unless you spot the little G (which is a millimeter wide on my screen), there's no easy way to tell wheter you're connected to a Hot Spot or GPRS.
3) GPRS monitor ?? If you don't activate it, it will tell 0$ - 0 bytes...Very misleading! Fido had no idea about this. They said it couldn't be done on the cellular because we didn't buy it from them. They are wrong! It was just a click on a particular tab.

In conclusion , GPRS with FIDO is not worthed. Customer support has no idea about the latest technologies (Pocket Pc 2005). To pay 50$ /month for the unlimited plan with a SLOW connection is completly ridiculous. My HIGH SPEED access for my computer is 40 $/month.

Wake up FIDO !

Yikes, $3500!

I have a daughter living in Vienna looking for some sort of broadband wireless. She travels around Yurup quite a bit.

Does anyone know if they have anything comparable to my Sprint EVDO card that costs me $59.99 for unlimited access?

Thanx

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Listed below are links to blogs that reference this entry: grps roaming works... technically.

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GPRS data from The Daily Grind
February 28, 2004 9:27 AM

Joi Ito is also doing GPRS data to his PowerBook. Hopefully, my bill won't quite match his: $3500 for one Read More

GPRS data from The Daily Grind
February 28, 2004 9:29 AM

Joi Ito is also doing GPRS data to his PowerBook. Hopefully, my bill won't quite match his: $3500 for one Read More

Now Joi Ito lives in a different world then I do financially but he has a point. Broadband started a revolution because the pricing was stable and affordable. It wasn't paid for by the early adopters. As much as I would love a GRPS connection, it won... Read More

I hate the constant looking-over-my-shoulder-watching-the-bill-mount-up that O2's GPRS tariffs entail - but if bills like Joi Ito's $3,500 GPRS bill are possible to run up, then I'm going to be looking over my shoulder for a while longer. $3,500 for... Read More

I hate the constant looking-over-my-shoulder-watching-the-bill-mount-up that O2's GPRS tariffs entail - but if bills like Joi Ito's $3,500 GPRS bill are possible to run up, then I'm going to be looking over my shoulder for a while longer. $3,500 for... Read More

CK over at 3650 and a 12-inchis getting an offer to tradein his Nokia 3650 for a nokia 3200 or... Read More

Joi Ito ist ein wenig in der Welt herumgefahren und hat dabei GPRS-Roaming benutzt: Land in a random city, flip open my PowerBook, click, "connect" and I was immediately online... Read More

Joi Ito ist ein wenig in der Welt herumgefahren und hat dabei GPRS-Roaming benutzt: Land in a random city, flip open my PowerBook, click, "connect" and I was immediately online... Read More

Joi Ito ist ein wenig in der Welt herumgefahren und hat dabei GPRS-Roaming benutzt: Land in a random city, flip open my PowerBook, click, "connect" and I was immediately online... Read More

Joi Ito ist ein wenig in der Welt herumgefahren und hat dabei GPRS-Roaming benutzt: Land in a random city, flip open my PowerBook, click, "connect" and I was immediately online... Read More

Joi Ito ist ein wenig in der Welt herumgefahren und hat dabei GPRS-Roaming benutzt: Land in a random city, flip open my PowerBook, click, "connect" and I was immediately online... Read More

Joi Ito ist ein wenig in der Welt herumgefahren und hat dabei GPRS-Roaming benutzt: Land in a random city, flip open my PowerBook, click, "connect" and I was immediately online... Read More

CLONMEL -- One of the biggest reasons I cling to the Nokia Communicator is that its GSM dialing feature lets me send mail and pictures at no more than half the cost of a GPRS transmission. According to phone charges Read More

JOI ITO -- One week after he got a mobile phone bill for $3500, Joi Ito is ratcheting back his moblogging. "Sorry about the sparse blogging the last few days," he says, after he foolishly used a Nokia 6600 Bluetooth/GRPS Read More

TITLE: $3500 monthly bill for GPRS aka Why flat rate bandwidth is the way to go URL: http://nabandwidthnews.blogware.com/blog/_archives/2004/3/10/26043.html IP: 207.178.248.9 BLOG NAME: North American Bandwidth News DATE: 03/11/2004 05:20:33 AM Read More

Joi Ito got a horrible $3500 GPRS bill while roaming in Europe. I have no idea how many MegaBytes, Joi was downloading, but the bill size was shocking to say at least. My mobile provider CBB(Danish) are ending their 6 months free GPRS in a couple of... Read More

I guess I'm not the only one that got bitten by T-Mobile's roaming charges: Joi Ito got a $3500 bill for international GRPS use. Since I didn't bring my wonderful Thinkpad T40 to France and Portugal during Christmas break, I... Read More

I guess I'm not the only one that got bitten by T-Mobile's roaming charges: Joi Ito got a $3500 bill for international GRPS use. Since I didn't bring my wonderful Thinkpad T40 to France and Portugal during Christmas break, I... Read More

I guess I'm not the only one that got bitten by T-Mobile's roaming charges: Joi Ito got a $3500 bill for international GRPS use. Since I didn't bring my wonderful Thinkpad T40 to France and Portugal during Christmas break, I... Read More

GPR$ from Service Provider Journal
April 28, 2004 3:17 AM

My sympathy to Joi Ito, who ran up a $3500 GPRS bill in a single month. Another sign of just how out of touch the carriers are with the economics of the Internet age. This, too, shall be routed around. Read More

Joi Ito ist ein wenig in der Welt herumgefahren und hat dabei GPRS-Roaming benutzt: Land in a random city, flip open my PowerBook, click, "connect" and I was immediately online... Read More

Russell Beattie writes about his coworker Jonathan Strauss receiving a nasty $1,154.99 bill from mobile data. Ouch... But stop whining, you are not the first: - $3500 bill for Joi Ito in 2004 => story ends up in Wired Magazine... Read More

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