I just got email saying that TypePad is being blocked in China. Can anyone else confirm this?

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I ask 5 of my friends did a test for me, they locate in different cities. It seems no problem to visit typepad.com and also no problem to login typepad system. So I don't typepad was blocked in China. :)

Interesting. I wonder if it's regional. The report I got via email was that several people where not about access TypePad at the moment. What region are your 5 friends in Kevin?

Beijing, Shanghai, GuangZhou, Nanjing, Hanzhou. My friends locate in these five city are no problem to visit or login typepad.com!

The weblogs on the typepad domain name certainly are blocked, see Brainsmurf, Living in China and my blog on this.
Probably it is the same way www.blogger.com is blocked. You can still enter the main site and even work on your weblog, but cannot open the weblogs itself with a 'blogspot' domain name.
LiC is now setting up alternatives for its members.

That's ture, subdomain typepad.com was blocked in China. like Fons said, User can't not visit weblogs of tyepad.com or blogs.com in China. I just called my partner in China who is the CEO of a company providing social networking service, He said probably the China Government are doing this to control information about recent TaiWan President election and 1989 Tiananmen Crisis. we could discuss this in detail by Email.

hi,joi,I just visited TP,and I am in Guangzhou(Canton)

Sorry that I cant visit any site like XXX.typepad.com or XXX.blogs.com

Seems China is cracking down on blogs. That pesky notion of free speech really seems to bother the government.
On March 18 China blocked access to two blogs sites
Blogbus.com and Blogcn.com.

Here is the article from ABC
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s1068965.htm

Typepad blogs in China have been blocked, but people can still go to www.typepad.com and work on their sites. They just can't see them. http://glutter.typepad.com has confirmed this.

You might want to find out why Blogcn and Blogbus are now unblocked. Blocking Typepad could be temporary because people have to pay for the service. Also there have been reports that Blogspot blogs are now unblocked in some regions, but I'm not sure of this.

YES. WE are blocked. I got a few people in China to test this and all has come back with the news that ALL typepad blogs are blocked.

Although we can work our ways around it. It still means that China has curbed free speech and it is a blow to freedom of information.

A Sad Day this is.

Yan

YES. WE are blocked. I got a few people in China to test this and all has come back with the news that ALL typepad blogs are blocked.

Although we can work our ways around it. It still means that China has curbed free speech and it is a blow to freedom of information.

A Sad Day this is.

Yan

YES. WE are blocked. I got a few people in China to test this and all has come back with the news that ALL typepad blogs are blocked.

Although we can work our ways around it. It still means that China has curbed free speech and it is a blow to freedom of information.

A Sad Day this is.

Yan

Jessica made a good point about how blogcn and others came back, of course I'm indignant - but I'm also still clinging to this new hope

I have heard how photocopiers and fax machines have been enabling technologies in the past for various movements, political or otherwise.

I guess they still have the advantage of being very hard to shut down, and anonymous - unlike the net.

Here's hoping that a few trivial technical blocks don't stop progress.

This link was going around in 2002. It allows you to test whether your site's filtered in China, though I haven't been able to get any results besides "indeterminate, please try back" lately...

http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/filtering/china/test/go.asp?URL=http://www.typepad.com

Yeah, Tipepad's blocked from Beijing, except for the portal site. (I can't reach glutter any more ! :,-( )

That probably means more and more people will get their own domain name.

(And why does this require an email ? Can't we have a little privacy here ???)

So blogging has been given the highest compliment a "democracy enabling idea" can receive.

The English speaking blog community has been reacting with a mix of technical workarounds, intelligent consideration, and woe-betide-me shrillness (brainysmurf.org should be in your RSS reader, by the way...much more of the first two than the last one there). Quality thoughts from Mark:

a) it is for social stability
b) it is not helpful to describe it as censorship, but more a temporary page redirection facility ("temporary" as in "the Ming Dynasty was temporary")
c) it is being investigated diligently by the relevant authorities
d) all registered private websites are available without any problem.
e) all Typepad blogs are accessible with Chinese characteristics

The Chinese community is much harder to reach b/c of the language gap. This certainly highlights some of the existing problems Joi is thinking about in the "Emerging Democracy for the >1st world" effort (is there more background/ongoing discussion available than what's here?)

China also blocked all the blog hosted on http://www.twblog.net

Check this http://www.twblog.net/archives/000999.html

TP is definitely unaccessible.

My associate in Shanghai confirms that, while http://www.typepad.com is reachable, hosted sites such as http://blah.typepad.com are not.

Interestingly enough, sites known to be hosted at TypePad but have domain masking activated are, for the most part, reachable by boxen in mainland China.

It does my heart good to know that, world round, those in charge of routers and firewalls are largely morons for whom the obvious will always be overlooked.

Should a TypePad hosted site, written for Chinese readers on the mainland like to continue to reach that readership, I've got a domain or two you may have so that you can activate domain mapping, which is a very painless process for TP accounts.

The proviso is that the site owner can't be able to afford a domain. You're on your honor about that. Just know I can't afford to be handing them over either. But screwing with draconian idiots is far more important than money.

It seems like it might be possible to script a tool that would 'rasterize' web pages (render it into a big bitmap and all of their links into encrypted links in an imagemap) and that tool might make it impossible for China to grok content in pages except through OCR.. Someone should write this tool and open source it. It would be slow, but it would work, and if it was spread around enough, it could be unstoppable. Ideally, it would be available on a number of platforms and be configurable to work on a number of different ports with a number of different protocols. (It could default to port 443 and https, though.) To a sniffer, the pages could just look like secure web pages..

What do people think of this idea? Has somebody already done it?

Protest the block and participate in a worldwide gesture of blogger solidarity by turning your blog borders and/or banner black.

Seems like slashdot.org has been banned after reporting the story. Sigh.

Seems like slashdot.org has been banned after reporting the story. Sigh.

Seems like slashdot.org has been banned after reporting the story. Sigh.

xxx.typepad.com and xxx.blogspot.com are all blocked, and have been for a while; Blogger.Com now appears to be blocked too.

it seems that the ban on the two has been lifted in China, or just in some region.

Phantom Poet in association with Spoken X Digital Media Group
is pleased to report that we have managed to infiltrate China's internet blockade. We are officially behind the Great
Wall spraying the spoken spectacular and leading the resistance through Peking: "Sound of Literati" witness the powerful experience of the spoken word Xplosion! Available now on Rhapsody/ChinaUnicom. . .

Joi, It's started again. www.asiapundit.com/2005/06/blacklisted.html

http://www.typepad.com/ works for me now. Also http://www.blogspot.com/ is fine - two months ago I couldn't view my own blog, but now I can, so something changed.

Sadly, http://en.wikipedia.org/ has recently been blocked.

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