Nokia asked me to be a guest speaker at their annual press event, Nokia Connection 2004. I was the only outside speaker and they told me I could say what I wanted. What a treat. ;-)

A summary of my presentation:

sharing++ open++ customer_oriented++ user_empowering++ blogs ++

DRM-- "pipes"-- "terminal devices"-- traditional_marketing--

12 Comments

Sadly, "Sharing" and "Open" still have a long way to go in the corporate world.

New capaign line:

"Eliminate the Middleman. Just don't eliminate us."

Congratulations for that one. I just started listening and when they said "Joichi Ito" I thought ... eh, wait a minute, I know that name ;)

Looking forward to hearing your part.

The presentation. Quite slow. Still downloading.

What does "pipes" and "terminal devices" mean in this content? Or maybe I will find out after watching it.

Mie's speaking at a Nokia conference right now too, for a second there I thought you must be at the same one, but she's at the one in Singapore.

Many telecom folks talk about "data" and "terminal devices" and think of themselves as pipes instead of talking about customers and communication. I think the terminology influences what people are thinking about when they think about the business.

Good presentation. Nice gesticulations. Fantastic summary style, though. All the best summaries are written like that, apparently.

Joi,

Nokia is not able to directly implement any of things++ you mention because they have no direct relationship with customers. Operators do.

This is the fundamental dilemma Nokia faces. As you are aware operators have their own branding plans that may or may not involve Nokia. Samsung, LG, NEC, Sharp, etc. are all willing to go to far greater lengths to please the operators then Nokia.

Ok, just watched it. What really came through was customer oriented, which I hope got through to the audience somehow. One of the best thing was the finishing words:

"Maybe five to ten years from now, in this device, you will have every single song, that's available in the world. Your problem is not gonna be how to get the song. The problem will be: Which song do you want to hear?"

They are focusing so hard on how to transfer content to you (and how to prevent it at the same time, DRM in a nutshell) so they forget the users and how and why they actually will use all the stuff that is available.

Hmmm, perhaps it's time to get a blog of my own. Can't just surf around and use other people's comment systems as my blog. :)

It's too bad there wasn't anyone at this event covering it in a blog style. Not that I have been able to find anyway. What happened, what was it like. You have a few photos but it's limited.

simon woodside

I have been serving in Iraq for over five months now as a soldier in the 2nd Battalion of the 503rd Airborne Infantry Regiment, otherwise known as the "ROCK."

We entered the country at midnight on the 26th of March; one thousand of my fellow soldiers and I parachuted from 10 jumbo jets (known as C-17s) onto a cold, muddy field in Bashur, Northern Iraq. This parachute operation was the U.S. Army's only combat jump of the war and opened up the northern front.

Things have changed tremendously for our battalion since those first cold, wet weeks spent in the mountain city of Bashur. On April 10 our battalion conducted an attack south into the oil-rich town of Kirkuk, the city that has since become our home away from home and the focus of our security and development efforts.

Kirkuk is a hot and dusty city of just over a million people. The majority of the city has welcomed our presence with open arms. After nearly five months here, the people still come running from their homes, in the 110-degree heat, waving to us as our troops drive by on daily patrols of the city. Children smile and run up to shake hands, in their broken English shouting "Thank you, mister."

The people of Kirkuk are all trying to find their way in this new democratic environment. Some major steps have been made in these last three months. A big reason for our steady progress is that our soldiers are living among the people of the city and getting to know their neighbors and the needs of their neighborhoods.

We also have been instrumental in building a new police force. Kirkuk now has 1,700 police officers. The police are now, ethnically, a fair representation of the community as a whole. So far, we have spent more than $500,000 from the former Iraqi regime to repair each of the stations' electricity and plumbing, to paint each station and make it a functional place for the police to work.

The battalion also has assisted in re-establishing Kirkuk's fire department, which is now even more effective than before the war. New water treatment and sewage plants are being constructed and the distribution of oil and gas are steadily improving.

All of these functions were started by our soldiers here in this northern city and are now slowly being turned over to the newly elected city government. Laws are being rewritten to reflect democratic principles and a functioning judicial system was recently established to bridge the gap between law enforcement and the rule of law.

The quality of life and security for the citizens has been largely restored and we are a large part of why that has happened.

The fruits of all our soldiers' efforts are clearly visible in the streets of Kirkuk today. There is very little trash in the streets, there are many more people in the markets and shops and children have returned to school.

This is all evidence that the work we are doing as a battalion and as American soldiers is bettering the lives of Kirkuk's citizens. I am proud of the work we are doing here in Iraq and I hope all of your readers are as well.

Lt. Col. Dominic Caraccilo

"Die dulci fruimini!"

Er, a Lieutenant Colonel parachuting with his troops ?

Anyway, babble similar to the above has been making the rounds via e-mail since ages...

A quick Google search shows that this fabricated prose — with slight stylistic variations — appears in many places under various authorships... See e.g.

http://www.pdrap.org/log_archive/archive_2003_10/

More comment on those letters allegedly written by some US soldier:

http://www.disinfopedia.org/wiki.phtml?title=Letters_home

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新宿南口、高島屋横の東急ハンズの1階に、本日 Nokia の専門店、ノキア・ライフスタイル・コレクション・コーナーがオープンとの情報。新宿は頻繁に訪れる場所でもあり、これはチェッ Read More

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