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Student smashes SMS record

A Singaporean student looks to have smashed the world record for high speed text messaging.

Kimberly Yeo, 23, managed to send a 160-character SMS message in just 43.24 seconds.

It knocked more than 20 seconds off the official record of 67 seconds held by Briton James Trusler.

That's like 36 words per minute.

Do you still think this thumb keyboard is silly?

via Seth Godin

5 Comments

There are fundamental problems with the common phone keypad for repetitive use.

You'd actually improve the usability of a regularly shaped phone quite a lot if you just turned it upside-down, with the display at the bottom and the buttons at the top. The buttons would be easier to press with your fingers, and the display would be almost as legible.

Who keeps track of these "records?"

Is there any point to being able to type an SMS at 36 wpm, though? I mean, if you've got so much to say and it would ordinarily take ages to type it all out, perhaps you're better off sticking to email or --- strange though it sounds --- actually calling someone!

Actually, one small survey in Japan shows 50% of kids had PC, all had mobile phones, all used mail, and NONE used their PC for mail. Again, this was a small sample of kids in Japan, but quite revealing and explains why people need to text at 36 wpm. Also, kids text in bed and during class when they can't talk. When they can talk, they often do.

Wow and I thought I could type faster than the speed of light!!

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Student smashes SMS record Insane. Basically the world record for texting the fastest is 36 words a minute. Can you imagine the RSI that one can get from something like that? It's nuts. :shocked: It reminded me of this cellphone that creates a virtual... Read More

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