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The New York Times has an interesting story about the rowdy anti-Japanese crowds at the recent Asian Cup soccer match in China between China and Japan.
The New York Times
"Kill! Kill! Kill!" the Chinese fans yelled. Or, echoing a patriotic song from another era, they shouted, roughly: "May a big sword chop off the Japanese heads!"
What's surprising is not that there were anti-Japanese sentiments, but that the article asserts that such sentiments are on the rise. According to the article, "... increasingly, the most strident criticism of Japan now comes from a generation born long after the end of the war, which in China is known as the War of Resistance against Japan." My impression is that most of the anti-Chinese sentiment in Japan is fueled by people like Governor Ishihara of Tokyo who remember the war, and not young post-war Japanese. (UPDATE: Mizuka just told me that there were a bunch of right-wing Japanese demonstrating in Kasumigaseki yesterday and they were mostly young.) There is a revisionist movement in Japan, but I have heard only 0.3% of school actually ended up using the controversial revised texts and the movement is considered a failure. However, I don't have a good sense of whether anti-Chinese sentiments are increasing or decreasing, but they are clearly here as I've blogged about in the past.

The "new anti-Japanese" in China represent a bad trend. At the Brainstorm conference in 2002, I heard Shimon Peres say, "What can you learn from History? Very little... History was written with red ink, wth bloodshed. We should educate our children how to imagine, not how to remember." I think his words are extremely relevant.

The article also quotes a Mr. Lu saying, "Like many young Chinese, he believes Japan is returning to militarism. 'I want China to be strong again,' Mr. Lu said at lunch the day before the game. He said China needed to be strong so it would not again succumb to foreign invaders." This is also quite an odd image. At a recent conference I went to, it was clear that the American no longer viewed Japan as a military threat. At this conference, it was pointed out that since Japan is aging so quickly, it can not be motivated very strongly to grow its military. Most countries which expanded security forces were usually countries that had a lot of young people. It was noted that the Kim Jon Il said during his trip across Russia on the train, that he had "too many people." This is one reason why he might be happier to send troops to war than Japan where there are so few young people.

In other news on the topic, it appears Japanese hackers went after a Chinese site and now the Chinese hackers are retaliating.

45 Comments

The next 50 years and the changing demographics (+40 million males) of China could change not just the face of Asia but the entire world.

The ultra-nationalistic Shintaro Ishihara is unfortunately the governor of Tokyo not the mayor. Don't get me wrong, if he was mayor that would also be unfortunate.

Mark, yes you are right. He is the governor. I'll fix it in the post.

I spent a little over a year in China back in 1988-89. In those days the government were ramping up criticism of foreign countries and also of non-Chinese who were in China at the time, mostly African students. I remember talking with some of the African students in Nanjing whose dorm had been ransacked by a mob incited by their university (initially it was supposed to be a protest against the African students who allegedly destroyed university property). http://diaspora.northwestern.edu/cgi-bin/WebObjects/DiasporaX.woa/wa/displayArticle?atomid=711
Their opinion was that the Chinese government used criticisum of foreigners as a way to release the steam that was building up against the Chinese government. I was there in about March or April of 89. A few months later the protests started in Beijing and a couple of months after that, the Tiananmen Massacre took place.

As a long time China watcher, I am of the opinion that Anti Japanese sentiment is probably being fueled for political purposes. It is pretty difficult to try and determine what they are positioning for, but the Chinese government lets these kinds of things happen.

The reporter states vaguely that this is "being called the latest example of a strain of rising anti-Japanese nationalism among many younger Chinese that seems increasingly volatile".

Who is calling it that? He never says. He probably just made it up himself and made it sound like a quote to give it authority. He then interviews a few random fans. This is garbage reporting.

Based on my own anecdotal evidence (countering the anecdotes of the Times), I'd say attitudes haven't changed much at all over the last 20 years. Travelling in Japanese groups in China, I've been on the receiving end of great kindness and also bigotry. And I recall some extremely virulent reaction when Hong Kong's MTR tried adding Japanese announcements at certain stations (I believe they had to pull the announcements in a matter of days).

Joi,

I would agree with your analysis that most of the anti-chinese feeling is fueled by Ishihara - as a way to remain in the spotlights. After all, he seems to be popular more for his style (in no particular order, populism, boyish smile, superstar brother, bold statements) than his content/ nationalism. And as Chris notes, the same goes for anti-japanese feelings in China - sadly, some young football fans only wait for a pretext to hate the other team, and some politicians love gullible, excited crowds...

One detail, however: is "New History", the controversial history textbook really, so insignificant? It was, indeed, not chosen as a textbook by many boards of education, but:

  • It was the first class textbook ever released to the public market, was in the top 10 best seller books for the two months following its release in June 2001, and sold 720,000 copies as of February 2002.
  • It (or at least the controversy around it) had some influence on the other history textbooks, all but one of which ended up muting their account of the sino-japanese war, and the boards of education eventually favored the "least masochistic" ones.

Source: John Nathan's [Japan Unbound] on the Japanese post-bubble "loss of identity", and the new forms of nationalism/populism that grew off it. A good read for anyone wishing to understand Japanese contemporary politics, by the way...

What goes around comes around. I can confirm that there is a growing anti-Chinese sentiment among young Koreans over recent attempts by Chinese historians to rewrite history.

Korean kids have been taught that Kogu-ryo, an ancient Korean nation preceding Ko-ryo from which 'Korea' stems from, occupied most of Manchuria. Now Chinese scholars are saying that Kogu-ryo was a province of China. Since Kogu-ryo extended down to Han-river which cuts Seoul in half, Chinese scholars are basically saying that North Korea belongs historically to China.

No wonder many people in Korea are pissed off at China these days.

Sigh. Behold the emergence of the Chinese Hooligan.
Anyway, why can’t both countries get along better ? China and (past) Japan share so many common cultural traits...

•Ruled by an autoritarian government where political dissent is likely to be brutally suppressed
•Main media channels controlled by the government, parceling out selective, government-sanctioned news and “information”
•Large income disparities between the rural and urban regions, and growing number of economically disenfranchised jobless people in the urban areas
•Use of sporting events, like the Olympic Games, and promotion of nationalistic, anti-foreign sentiment to divert the populace’s diffuse economic and political discontent
•Large population numbers and energy supply concerns prodding the government to make assertive territorial claims where natural resources might be found
•An intense urge to catch up, economically and militarily, with the nations perceived to be technologically more advanced
•Heavy involvement of the armed forces in the formulation of internal and external policy
•Partial to installing governments of doubtful international standing in annexated areas, propped up by repressive occupying armed forces.

We might see a situation whereby it would be as dangerous for a Chinese to walk around in (insignificant) Ishihara’s Tokyo as it would be for a Japanese to take a stroll in Beijing ;-)

Mark wrote:

The ultra-nationalistic Shintaro Ishihara is unfortunately the governor of Tokyo not the mayor. Don't get me wrong, if he was mayor that would also be unfortunate.

Mayor, governor, what’s the difference? He’s the chief executive of a local government anyway, and thus a very significant personality, as it’s obvious that Ishihara’s pronouncements — just like Koizumi’s visits to the Yasukuni shrine to pay his respects and remember the millions of Japanese war victims — obviously officially represent the Japanese government.
OTOH, the numerous apologies for Japan’s WW2 war exactions expressed by Japan’s Prime Ministers are obviously “personal” and are thus irrelevant or not “real”... ;-)

Why can't Chinese, Japanese, and Korean all get along? It's because each country feels superior to others. It's mostly the guy thing IMHO 'cause only the guys call people of other countries nasty names. Only consolation is that this doesn't usually happen if following three conditions are met:

1. one-on-one
2. face-to-face
3. sober

Don Park:

Why can't Chinese, Japanese, and Korean all get along? It's because each country feels superior to others.

Although most of the comments above basically regard relations between those countries symmetric, I don't think so. Imagine the Chinese team visits Japan to have a soccer game, do you expect your national anthem is drowned out by booing by Japanese audience or the car of the ambassador is stoned? Surely back in Korea-Japan Worldcup there was booing to Japanese team in a studium in Korea, but even in Korea it's not that bad as in today's China.

Other point I wonder about comments posted here is, Ishihara is a right-winger, that's OK, but what's the point in his comment about this incident that should be criticized so much? He described those raging Chinese people as "mindo ga hikui" which means they are from uncivilized class in Chinese society, that's a bit rude comment for a governor, but other criticism against Chinese government is not that invalid considering PRC supports countries like N. Korea. Ishihara is a macho zealot and not a person who is suitable to represent Tokyo, but at least his remark is based on some facts that can't be negligible altogether. According to this white paper about foreigner crime, 1/3 of arrests consist of the Chinese (excluding those from Hong Kong and Taiwan) and on the top all those 10 years (Korean is at the 4th with 10%).

http://www.pdc.npa.go.jp/hakusyo/h15/html/E1101016.html

KL, if you click on the link, you will see a analysis of his article in Sankei Shimbun. In it, he says, "minzoku teki DNA wo hyoji suru you na hanzai", which is basically saying that Chinese have criminal DNA. It's a bit stronger than "mindo ga hikui" Chinese being rowdy. He said this in one of the biggest newspapers in Japan.

Joi Ito:


In it, he says, "minzoku teki DNA wo hyoji suru you na hanzai", which is basically saying that Chinese have criminal DNA. It's a bit stronger than "mindo ga hikui" Chinese being rowdy.

I know that and what I mean here is even such remark can't flatten out all contexts around his comment. His comment about Asia Cup can be seen here (it's bit long movie though...) http://www.metro.tokyo.jp/GOVERNOR/KAIKEN/ASX/m20040806.ASX and he says this "mindo ga hikui" comment. As for his particular comment about Chinese DNA, I've read comments in another entry in your blog http://joi.ito.com/archives/2004/03/12/chinese_being_frozen_out_of_japanese_student_visa_process.html and they suggest he didn't say all Chinese are criminals in the original context, no?

A couple of thoughts:


-anti-Japanese sentiment is encouraged or at least permitted by the Chinese government. if people try to protest other things, it will most likely be shut down. if it's a protest against Japan, the police will probably stand by and let it happen.


-a more important question is why is there anti-Japanese sentiment in the first place? the reason without a doubt is World War II. Many Chinese feel that the Japanese government never truly apologized for what they did. This view is reinforced by official visits to the Yasukuni shrine which includes memorials to Class A war criminals, the courts rejecting the lawsuits by former "comfort women" who were forced into prostitution by the Japanese army and the on-going territorial dispute of the Diaoyutai islands.


I have no doubt that the vast majority of Japanese people are peace-loving but it is the percieved attitude of the Japanese government that upsets many Chinese people.




I had three Japanese friends who worked for a company that transferred them from Manila to Beijing. They were so excited about the move. Finally, they had to return to Tokyo. They said that the anti-Japanese sentiment they felt in China was so strong that they ended up hating the place.

This article was posted in the SCMP by Philip Yeung to add some more colour to this topic.

http://focus.scmp.com/focusnews/ZZZXL3Z4OXD.html
Why Japan shouldn't criticise Chinese fans

That the Asian Cup final between China and Japan was more than just a game of football is self-evident. To those quick to condemn the Chinese fans' behaviour, however, I say, look not at the symptoms, but at the cause - the unfinished historical agenda that overshadows and underlines it.

Ideally, sport should be divorced from politics. But sportsmanship presupposes the existence of a moral equilibrium. Where it is absent, it has led to boycotts in the past. For millions of unindemnified Chinese war victims, how do you applaud the Japanese team when, in their eyes, the blood on Japan's hands - while it has dried - is still unwashed?

Germany, similarly guilty of war crimes, has apologised humbly, profusely and repeatedly - augmenting its apologies with generous compensation for its victims. In its latest act of contrition, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder attended the Warsaw memorial service to deliver a heartfelt apology to the Polish people. These acts of penance help close the final chapter on a tragic past.

Japan, in stark contrast, has refused to help the healing process. To date, all Chinese victims remain uncompensated. Forced to seek expensive individual redress through the Japanese courts, nearly every one of the lawsuits has been slapped down. None of the "comfort women" forced into sexual slavery or human guinea pigs in Japan's wartime biological experiments have received a single dollar in compensation. Japan underlines its contempt for its neighbours through Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's visits to the Yasukuni Shrine to honour convicted war criminals.

Last week, the controversial Tokyo mayor, Shintaro Ishihara, implored the emperor to visit the shrine to spite its Asian neighbours on August 15, the day of surrender. Guilty of sins of commission during the war, Japan is guilty of sins of omission after it.

As if the shrine visits were not enough, it has tried to alter the facts of history by deleting all textbook references to the Rape of Nanking, the scene of more than 300,000 murders and indiscriminate rape. Some even proclaim that it was a hoax. A nation incapable of admitting its past misdeeds is doomed to repeat them.

As long as Japan lives in denial, there can be no closure. The game may have ended, but its bitter aftermath - anger and mutual mistrust - remains. Unresolved resentment sows the seeds of future conflicts. Against the enormity of crimes against humanity, unsporting behaviour is a trifling matter.

For its own reasons, the Chinese government does not otherwise permit anti-Japanese demonstrations. Stifled at home and thwarted in Japan, the sports stadium becomes the Chinese people's only safe court of international appeal.

Sportsmanship is an ideal of gentility, not a moral absolute. Morality trumps decorum, any day. As long as the war wounds remain untreated, they will continue to fester. Lecturing China on sporting behaviour is, thus, an inversion of logic. Defusing the issue is not a matter of diplomatic arm-wrestling, but of righting past wrongs.

If Japanese officials need a reminder of what their nation did to China, I recommend Iris Chang's sorrowful book, The Rape of Nanking. It is an easy way to realign your logic - and come to grips with reality.


For millions of unindemnified Chinese war victims, how do you applaud the Japanese team when, in their eyes, the blood on Japan's hands - while it has dried - is still unwashed?

I guess it is truly a pity that the billions in aid money that has flowed from Japan into China for the past several decades have been embezzled e.g. by Chinese bureaucrats, instead of being used for the people’s good... These ne’er-do-well Japanese... why didn’t they install a government truly accountable to the people in China at the end of WW2, instead of leaving the country at the mercy of these corrupt communists ;-)
As for the younger Japanese who were born in the past 60 or 70 years, woe unto them if they ever forget that they have “dried, unwashed (Chinese?) blood” on their own hands...

Germany, similarly guilty of war crimes, has apologised humbly, profusely and repeatedly - augmenting its apologies with generous compensation for its victims. In its latest act of contrition, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder attended the Warsaw memorial service to deliver a heartfelt apology to the Polish people.

Actually, Schröder’s apologies should not count, as they are “personal”. No, wait. Maybe his apologies *do* count, because they’ve been uttered in German, eine Kultur, Sprach- und Denkraum in which most Chinese sind, um, sehr bewandert. Japan’s Prime Ministers’, OTOH, hatten die bloß Verwegenheit in Japanisch um Entschuldigung zu bitten, was ihre Meinung zu schätzen und ihre Semantik zu analysieren anscheinend unmöglich macht, selbst für gelehrte Chinese... Vielleicht sollen die Japaner fortan mit der Chinesen in Deutsch kommunizieren...

Japan underlines its contempt for its neighbours through Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's visits to the Yasukuni Shrine to honour convicted war criminals.

Yup. How dare a Prime Minister go remember and honor the countless Japanese war dead enshrined at Yasukuni ? Doesn’t the whole universe agree that these hundreds of thousands of young Japanese soldiers conscripted and killed in a senseless war are ALL war criminals, and thus should not be acknowledged in any way by a head of government ?

KL, if Japan or Korea kept losing soccer games to China like the way China have against the two countries, I wouldn't be surprised to hear boos.

BTW, last time this happened, it was against Koreans. Chinese hooligans not only booed and thrown bottles, but they also pissed on and made physical attacks against Korean spectators while the police just watched. Damn shame.

Don Park:


KL, if Japan or Korea kept losing soccer games to China like the way China have against the two countries, I wouldn't be surprised to hear boos.

I understand your point and it may apply to the China-Japan final, but I have to note the fact here, Chinese fans also booed in the match between Japan and Jordan, only against Japan and Japanese fans :P

In the old days, the Japanese national team kept loosing against the Korean team, but there's no such booing against Korean national anthem was made by Japanese people. Instead, masochistic Japanese people booed their own team to the ground :)

Don Park:

KL, if Japan or Korea kept losing soccer games to China like the way China have against the two countries, I wouldn't be surprised to hear boos.

I understand your point and it may apply to the China-Japan final, but I have to note the fact here, Chinese fans also booed in the match between Japan and Jordan, only against Japan and Japanese fans :P

In the old days, the Japanese national team kept loosing against the Korean team, but there's no such booing against Korean national anthem was made by Japanese people. Instead, masochistic Japanese people booed their own team to the ground :)

At a recent conference I went to, it was clear that the American no longer viewed Japan as a military threat.

Might be fair to mention that while they pulled off one extremely successful raid on American territory, the Japanese military never sought to invade or occupy a single square inch of the US mainland. Even so, Joe Six Pack sometimes complains about Pearl Harbor to this very day. Imagine how he'd act if there were a Japanese invasion of purple mountains majesty.

"May a big sword chop off the Japanese heads?"


Clearly the Chinese have been spending too much time reading "The Klingon Dictionary". Maybe they need to hire some US sports consultants and get some better cheers.


As a civilized person and Irish American, I'd just like to say that I am glad that the Irish apparently don't subscribe to Philip Yeung's notions of sporting events as places of national moral reckoning. If they did, virtually every Anglo-Irish meeting in sports would be a potential bloodbath.
And I agree with Joey deVilla, but might recommend a Duke basketball fan clinic for Chinese spectators as the answer.

I just put together an article about the Asian Cup issue and media coverage of it:
http://www.chinajapan.org/eaia/index.php?p=6

I believe that the growing amount of anti-Japanese sentiment in China can be traced to the amount of nationalistic and xenophobic material present in Chinese educations materials. Children are forced to watch popular propaganda movies depicting the Japanese invation and associated atrocities and read grade school literature glorifying nationalism.

For young Chinese, the Japanese invasion isn't just a historical event of half a century ago - it's a badge of shame that still carries weight to this day. The government has only served to exploit this sense of nationalism for their own purposes, unfortunately. Any attempt to quell anti-Japanese sentiments are superficial at best.

To MostlyVowels's #17: Consider the case of a Wall Street firm paying millions of dollars in fines while admitting to no wrongdoing for some particular, ah, "market movement".



The man in the street who lost his shirt would point out that the fine money went to the government and "what about me?"



As far as the firm was concerned, it paid its fine but it did no wrong, case closed and just shuddup about it already.



Different people will come to directly opposite conclusions regarding the "admitting to no wrongdoing" bit.

To npgs:

1) Are all the employees of a particular Wall Street firm responsible for a firm's occasional mis-steps, which are typically commited by a limited few ? Are the younger Japanese, who were born during the past 60 or 70 years to be held accountable for what Japan did in WW2 ?

2) Your example firm admits to no wrongdoing. Japanese heads of government, OTOH, have repeatedly made apologies and expressed contrition for Japan's exactions.
People who continue to criticize Japan for not apologizing, comparing it e.g. with Germany, would have more credibility if they were just not parroting politically expedient dogma, and could demonstrate some understanding of the Japanese and/or German languages, instead of relying exclusively on translated / filtered / interpreted “information” approved e.g. by the Chinese Government.

"May a big sword chop off the Japanese heads!"
do you konw where this lyric from?
it's just a song that famous in china during the ww2.
lack of information integrality,what this excerption
want to hint at?

This article is not quite true.

1. the song "May a big sword chop off the Japanese heads" you use is from the ww2 when japanese ravaged China. We were sure to need a song to encourage people to fight back.

2. Japanese never say sorry to Chinese like German say sorry to the European countries

3. japanese continue distorting the truth and glorify the war in their history text book.

4. "the American no longer viewed Japan as a military" threat because American never suffered as much as Chinese.It is not an Asia country. Thread will hardly go to their land.

4. Chinese never stop trying to look forward but Japanese never stop hurting our feelings.

Zhang:

1 - Yes, I realize it is a WW2 song, but using it as a chant against soccer players seems a bit rude. They are not in China to ravage you, they are there to participate in a sport.

2 - Japanese have said sorry, but I agree. It has not been as strong or clear as the Germans.

3 - Yes. I think the level of government or popular support for this text book revisionist movement is disputable though.

4.1 - Possibly true, but they did feel more threathened before and the Japanese did bomb Pearl Harbor and kill a lot of American soldiers.

4.2 - I think that's a relative statement. I think the treatment of the Japanese soccer team in China hurt the feelings of many Japanese. There are also many Japanese trying to look forward.

I am sorry to say that you don't know the hurt the Japs once had done to us . As a 20-year-old Chinese , the most thing I want to do is to fuck Japs .

to all:
i just want to tell what i'm feeling as a common chinese. first of all, china government never fans anti-japanese sentiment even after japan approved the revised history textbook. on the contrary, no even a word was broadcasted on media, such as cctv and local tv station. it is obvious that china government is trying their best to keep peaceful with japs.
however, no matter what china government do, japanese never and will not admit their crime to chinese, which is the fuse of anti-japanese sentiment. japanese is a wild race on the world, who aggress other country with beautiful excuse. they killed so many people but they called themselves victims of war. they absolutely what they have done to chinese. they always handle a bundle of flower in one hand and a sword in the other hand. behind the smile is their faces of beast. the more you know japs, the more you hate them.

FUCK UR MOTHERS CHINESE YELLOW FUCKIN COMMUNISTS

Come on guys, take it easy. Yelling and calling names never made things better. In this situation, nobody's wrong and nobody's right.

I don't like those F-words posted.As one who was born and grown up in Nanjing,it is impossible to have good impression to Japs.But I do agree that young japanese should not be responsible for what their grandaparents committed in China.However it is not comfortable to know that young Japs know very little about what Japan did cruelly to other countries in Asia during WWII.Compensation is only a way to show the regretion for crime.The most important thing is to tell people to prevent the similar thing occuring again between China and Japan.Personally ,I see no good attitude from japansese officals and government,especially from those remarks of right-wings politians. NO doubt Chinese government takes the advantage of anti-Japanese sentiment now,yet the hatre to Japan from the mass is real.Even without the permission of protest, i am sure the young generation will use some other means to show their anger to japan.It is a prevalent feeling that Japan is a false friend to China.

the very thing i'm now going to do and will do forever is to fuck japs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And that would bring you to the same level as those who participated in the Rape of Nanjing. Two wrongs don't make a right, buddy.

This whole ordeal is petty.
This is just breeding more retarded backwards ass people.

I live in NYC. The melting pot of all world cultures and as far I see all my Nip brothers have love for Chink brothers.

Fuck all you bitches that are crying about the war they never experienced. You are not doing anybody any favors by acting like a fool.


just want to say that I don't hate japs but I hate jap culture. I think it's unprecedent in modern history the degree of cruelty employed by the japs against chinese civilians during ww2. Question arises of why and how the japs can committee those heinous crimes. The hideous acts speaks volumes about their hideous culture. Their refusal to sincerely apologise reflects on their lack of insight. Any culture that refuses to show remorse after having caused such suffering deserves to be wiped off the face of the earth.
I think that people are right to be cautious to keep jap militarism in check. Cause, if they ever tried anything like that again, I would be first to sign up and go and kill me some japs.

[quote]Sigh. Behold the emergence of the Chinese Hooligan.
Anyway, why can’t both countries get along better ? China and (past) Japan share so many common cultural traits...

•Ruled by an autoritarian government where political dissent is likely to be brutally suppressed
•Main media channels controlled by the government, parceling out selective, government-sanctioned news and “information”
•Large income disparities between the rural and urban regions, and growing number of economically disenfranchised jobless people in the urban areas
•Use of sporting events, like the Olympic Games, and promotion of nationalistic, anti-foreign sentiment to divert the populace’s diffuse economic and political discontent
•Large population numbers and energy supply concerns prodding the government to make assertive territorial claims where natural resources might be found
•An intense urge to catch up, economically and militarily, with the nations perceived to be technologically more advanced
•Heavy involvement of the armed forces in the formulation of internal and external policy
•Partial to installing governments of doubtful international standing in annexated areas, propped up by repressive occupying armed forces.

We might see a situation whereby it would be as dangerous for a Chinese to walk around in (insignificant) Ishihara’s Tokyo as it would be for a Japanese to take a stroll in Beijing ;-)[/quote]

Aren't you taking about America there?

What is wrong with Ishihara? Japanese people are some of kindest people on the earth. Just because the governor is pro-Japan doesn't make him a "ultra-nationalist" or an "extreme right winger".

Why don't you compare the things he says with those of a -real- ultra-nationalist or right-winger, like in France or England for instance.

Ishihara and Japanese nationalism is CUTE in comparison.

And for all the irrational Japan bashers in China, you need to reflect on your own history before you get to reflect on other people's treatment of their history.

Core, you have to differentiate between "kind people" and "polite people". The Chinese are kind. The Japanese are polite. I have Chinese and Japanese friends. I don't know how they get along with each other, but all of them are pretty cool. But I feel that the Japanese impose some sort of artificial kindness about them wherever they go, unlike sincere kindness.

9/11- Al Qaeda attacked and murdered US civilians, and many Americans hate them for this. Why is this hate justified and Anti-Japanese sentiments from China not?

because 9/11 happend 5 years ago and Al Qaeda is still a real threat to US, whereas WWII happend 60 years ago(are you blind, do i have to tell you this?) and japan is not able to harm and wouldn't want to harm china anymore.

No offense, but you Americans asked for 9/11 to happen. Siding with Israel all the time isn't going to help.

i"think there is no other most maniac being than japanese in WWII,they are a big criminal ever in dworld,they had killed many,they really need attention from dworld especially china center of culture in dpast which most suffered

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