Redscreen
Microsoft Longhorn has upgraded from the "Blue Screen of Death" to the "Red Screen of Death". Nice new look.

Via Michael Kaplan via Willl

UPDATE: Willl's friend noticed that "execution" is spelled "exectuion". Either this is a hoax, or they haven't spellchecked Longhorn. Can anyone out there confirm this RSOD?

UPDATE 2: It appears that Michael is an employee of Microsoft. He also informs us that the RSOD is not an "upgrade". Longhorn still has BSOD. RSOD is for really bad errors.

77 Comments

Well, I wouldn't call it an "upgrade" since "Blue Screens of Death" are unchanged -- they just added a new kind of error for a serious case that did not fit in the blue screen category. :-)

Complete with typo :)

I think a better question might be why your comments say they were posted on May 8 when it is only May 7.

It's May 8 in Japan.

This looks like a (fairly bad) hoax. I'll believe it when I see a better screenshot. ;)

One has to wonder about the motivations of those who criticise the mis-spellings of unreleased software.

I have always said that being in Japan was like being in the future, but I guess I forgot my own rule.

This is not a hoax, Melissa. It was pulled off an actual vpc session...

Beautiful, instead of the faint hope that my system might be alive (blue screen), this just says bonjour!

=P

I think Amiga should try to sue Microsoft for copying the scheme of yellow (blue) and red (ha! red!) guru meditation errors.

Hmm Communist, red state - blue state, Microsoft? Someone give us some satire.

Blue screen, red screen, who really gives a rats a**?

To make everyone happy, they should settle on a purple polka dotted screen. ;D

it brings back to old feelings of the 'Guru Meditation'! those good old days... now keep clicking the left mouse button and hope it gets out of the error message (hoping it was just a minor read error of the floppy disk)!

FYI: "really bad error" in Microsoft's eyes is anything that might prompt you to install Linux.

As someone beat me to above, it looks like the Amiga "Guru Meditation" is back! Needs the blinking/pulsing red border though.

" Amiga equivalent of panic in Unix (sometimes just called a guru or guru event). When the system crashes, a cryptic message of the form “GURU MEDITATION #XXXXXXXX.YYYYYYYY” may appear, indicating what the problem was. An Amiga guru can figure things out from the numbers. "

I just feel sorry for little fanboys like Mark w/ their lame-ass smug f'ing comments about how ppl shouldn't poke fun at retarded programmers who can't spell. Ummmm.... yeah because M$ can't afford the best of the best employees right? Wait... they should clean up their code right in the last week before shipping? No, I've got it - This OS has only been in development for 3 1/2 years so of course it is going to be EXTREMELY rough around the edges, right? Hey idiot! An official release candidate was made public to beta testers... IMHO this OS should be 99% ready to ship.

"If the problem continues, please contact your system administrator or computer manufacturer."

Interesting that MS has no plans to begin supporting their own software.

Good ol' Michael Kaplan (MichKa). Looks like he couldn't hack it on his own and went back to M$. I can remember when he used to bore and insult people on M$'s newsgroups about that laughable language Visual Basic, how he boasted how he was such an expert on i18n, how he was a "renegade" Most Vociferous Punk, and how everyone should all kiss Matt Curland's butt. Jeez, what a miserable bore Kaplan was (and probably still is).

Speaking as a software test engineer, since spelling errors are simple to fix they are almost always fixed within a day or so. It's unlikely that dozens of test engineers working on Longhorn failed to notice this error, so I'd hope the reason for the error is that not many have seen it (not many RSOD's). If that's not the case, maybe the programmers are too busy with other showstoppers to fix a spelling error..
But jonny quest is right, release candidates shouldn't have spelling errors in common or important parts of the software.

Now we don't have a choice between the red or the blue pill.

RSODs are red
BSODs are blue
One error is fatal,
and the other one is too...

Red M&M, blue M&M, they all come out the same

Spelling and Software -- yeah, they get ignored, until someone who cares more about the spelling sees the error message. Personally, I care about both, but the risk here is focusing too much on the little spelling errors such that it distracts from the main objective: software functionality.

You cannot say "not enough people have seen it" because it's probably a text string in a i18n translation file, and probably many developers have seen it but thought "oh yeah, I remember that, I should remember to report that after I fix the error itself...". I was working on a handset that is about to be released and still asks for "fliename".

Remember why the problem of NT Server dying after 26 days (A windows "lbolt" problem) was not found for a year? Because NT never ran for 26 straight days. You cannot say that this error screen is never seen.

BTW: in "Willl's friend noticed...", "Willl" has too many "L"s. How many missed that one?

Spelling is checked by the i18n translators at the very end, we all hope, or else we get to laugh from atop our high-horses when it's released!

"I just feel sorry for little fanboys like Mark w/ their lame-ass smug f'ing comments"


Thanks for the update. I'm sure those Microsoft employees are not quite as smart as you. We will all take your intelligent conversations into consideration as proof of your demonostrated expertise in software engineering. Perhaps we'll even reward you a Turing award for your contributions to operating systems research.

Idiot.

"Interesting that MS has no plans to begin supporting their own software."

Valid point, however BSODs (or RSODs, as the case may be) are now more often caused by failing devices or bad device drivers than actual operating system errors. Hence, it makes sense to contact your hardware vendor.

FWIW, the Microsoft Anti-Spyware beta had 3 spelling errors in it, and the final shipping version of Windows Update Services has a grammatical error in one of the pages. I'm at home and on a Mac, so I can't post the details right now, but it's fairly common for prerelease software to be incorrect or to contain humorous quips that are ironed out in the final builds by marketing and internal review, etc. The programmers weren't generally English majors, after all.

If you've gotten as far as a BSOD or RSOD, how are you going to take a screenshot? You've already got a kernel fault. I also don't beleive that the RSOD is going to take a window around it, since window management would presumably be dead, too. It would then be the RWOD, perhaps. No, this has got to be a hoax. I'd be more likely to believe advertising on the BSOD.

@ Sheldon Linker; the user is running Longhorn in a virtual machine much like how PearPC operates.

>The programmers weren't generally English majors, after all.
Yeah, they are probably from India. :D
>If you've gotten as far as a BSOD or RSOD, how are you going to take a screenshot?
Look. He's using Microsoft Virtual Machine, so he can take a screenshot with his REAL machine.

I think a 'heckling' blog category is brilliant. Wish blogger had categories. sigh.

speaking from a script-kiddy POV all I can say is that I depend on a good Editor/Beta tester to find my spelling mistakes. I'm usually too worried about the underlying code to bother with those inevitable (and mundane) fixes...

Spelling errors are nothing... cookies are delicous delicacies.

This screenshot could be real because it's running inside a virtual host (either VMware or MS's own) so it would be easy to get a screenshot.

Also - who said that NT couldn't stay up for longer that 26 days is wrong, I don't know what production systems he was running but it's just such crap - he should know better.

Funny on the spelling error. In all previous version(s) of CheckDisk, M$ also says "checking indexes." I'm quite sure that 'indexes' is substandard to 'indeces'.

It might make troubleshooting easier (by phone/email), though, to know if it's a blue screen error or a red screen error.

Indices, you mean?

Yaaaah, great error :)

"Respect" MS for that RSOD :lox:

All info about that: http://www.kompiuterija.lt

confirmed :)

heres what you need to do:

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows Longhorn 5048" /NOEXECUTE=OPTIN /FASTDETECT /USENEWLOADER /DETECTHAL
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows Longhorn 4074" /FASTDETECT /DETECTHAL /USENEWLOADER
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(3)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /FASTDETECT


ok, the USENEWLOADER tag: append it to any non-5048 OS (in my case, longhorn 4074) and reboot. it will then be added to the new boot menu. try booting off of that older OS through the new boot menu and Voila!

> The programmers weren't generally English majors, after all.

You see, I'm not an English major either. In fact, English is not even my native language. But when I see obvious errors in messages or in code comments, a question automatically pops up in my mind: if the programmer was so sloppy with his English, what are the chances that the code he wrote is any better?

By the way, I too couldn't avoid noticing how this RSOD thing resembles how they "removed" guru meditations on the Amiga. Well, they didn't... They just called them "software failures"...


Oh my, oh my.

Please follow this simple rule and your karma will certainly increase.

Please save your screenshots as PNG image files and *not* JPEG. JPEG is lossy and suitable for natural photography not for screenshots!

@ Jonathan

Piss on PNG, save it as a BMP! Absolutely zero loss there mate!

And this is a reason to use Longhorn? No thanks, I think I'll stick with something cheaper, and more supported, and more stable.

Or they have worked really hard or how can the boot manager able to produce a RSOD inside a graphical "notepad" like this. Have they managed to load a VGA driver before the boot loader?

If you've gotten as far as a BSOD or RSOD, how are you going to take a screenshot?

Take a look at the picture. He's running the session in a virtual machine window.

Major news in Longhorn: A Red Screen of Death. Is that a communist Red Screen of Death or a republican...

Republican RSOD is the new Communist RSOD. The difference is that, no matter how many errors crop up, MS will stand by their decision to let the bugs stay in the product.

Hoax!

> IMHO this OS should be 99% ready to ship.

Heh. Not likely. Bear in mind that only in the last few months have they gotten serious about starting to decide which features they can really finish in time to include them (e.g., pushing back most of the harder-to-implement WinFS features for a later release). In other words, Longhorn isn't even feature-complete yet, much less have they started to debug it. As for the public beta, think of it as more of a technology preview, conducted mostly for marketing reasons, to keep the most impatient customers from rioting; real beta testing would be premature at this point (and, in any case, there is no conclusive evidence that Microsoft has ever done serious beta testing before the product's first release goes gold master; fixes for problems uncovered in beta traditionally go in the service packs and/or updates; you can say what you like about this practice, but Microsoft's customers won't tollerate a Debian-style "when it's ready" release schedule (although, Longhorn has gone further in that direction than any previous major Microsoft product, it seems)).

> Beautiful, instead of the faint hope
> that my system might be alive (blue
> screen), this just says bonjour!

I think you may have been fooling yourself. The last time I saw a system come back to life and keep working after a BSOD was under Windows 3.11 for Workgroups. I don't know that this is really possible in recent versions -- I know for certain out of the tens of thousands of Win98SE BSODs I've seen over the years I've never seen the system recover after one; certainly it's not likely enough to warrant anything I would call hope, other than perhaps "When was the last time I saved? Did I save a minute ago when I finished that one thing? Oh, I *hope* I saved..."

I have less experience with NT/2K/XP BSODs, for two reasons (namely, they seem to occur rather less often (probably due to the memory protection), plus I have less overall experience with that OS), so it's conceivable that under that OS you can recover after a BSOD -- but I doubt it.

I'd be curious to know exactly what criteria Longhorn uses to differentiate a BSOD versus a RSOD. Is it just that certain types of errors cause the RSOD, or has there been a systematic attempt to categorize errors as "red" or just "blue"?

Ok, if you people can't read, ill give it for free: it says "Microsoft Virtual PC 2004" at the top of the windows. Still don't get it? It's like vmWare, it runs a Virtual PC on your real PC. The Guest OS (the one on the virtual) does NOT affect the Host OS. Damn, how stupid can people get?

I wonder... when you get BSOD you have to reset in 99% cases. With RSOD your PC blast into pieces?

Jonadab: if you happen to get a BSOD under the NT5 kernel youre screwed. End of story. However, you hardly ever get them. Last time i got it was from a *very* bad Bluetooth stack driver. The other time was when my memory had gone bad (left me thinking for 2 days before i thought of actually checking the hardware).

About the RSOD, as i see from the screenshot this shows up in the bootloader, thats before the NT5 kernel boots. So it may be a bootloader-specific error. Only time will prove me wrong.

It's still a crappy error display. It gives no information about what might have caused the error.

Gates claimed that his business model was better than the OSS model. He claimed that a proprietary system would generate revenue for improving existing technology and yet with all the billions of dollars flowing in every second, their idea of improving their system was to add a Red Screen Of Death.....

We here in the Linux community actually fix problems. We do not SPACKLE over them. We don't BONDO the fenders. We don't throw a red carpet over the hole in the damn floor.

Billions of dollars and their solution is to add another screen. Spelling errors are the least of their problems right now but the point was made earlier that if little care was given to the wording then what does that say about the code?

I hope that Bill will come to understand the superiority of the OSS model and embrace it. It just seems a waste of money to pay his people all that money and all they can do is add another screen to the system. No innovations, just another screen.

This isn't a hoax.

I've gotten the red screen once, on a very pre-beta1 build, and that was the first time that the new bootloader was trying to come up. After that things were fine.

Yes, the misspelling is in the actual code. I saw that as well.

If I remember correctly there was a misspelled word in windows scandisk utility back in the windows 9x days. Misspelled words are not uncommon in program menus and error messages. Unlike typing a letter in MS word, most program development tools don't have spellcheck.

Good lord.... I can't believe I read 1/10th of this thread. WHO CARES.

Hey everyone ...look! It's William Shatner!

> Also - who said that NT couldn't stay
> up for longer that 26 days is wrong,
> I don't know what production systems
> he was running but it's just such crap
> - he should know better.

It was fourty-some days, and it was Windows 95. It had no impact on NT. With those changes, though, although it sounds like an urban legend, it is actually true, and can be found in a really old MSKB article. (I found out about this when a Dan's Data review linked to the MSKB article in question.) The part about how it took years before anyone noticed is true. But it wasn't NT.

> By the way, I too couldn't avoid noticing
> how this RSOD thing resembles how they
> "removed" guru meditations on the Amiga.
> Well, they didn't... They just called
> them "software failures"...

Oh, you mean like General Protection Fault became Illegal Operation? (Which, incidentally, is *really* poor word choice; approximately 15% of end users see this message and think the computer is accusing them of violating some law. "[name of application] crashed" would be a more user-friendly first line; the dialog could still give the same other details.)

> Jonadab: if you happen to get a BSOD
> under the NT5 kernel youre screwed.

That's sort of what I figured; I just hadn't seen enough BSODs (under that OS) to be sure about it.

> However, you hardly ever get them.

Yeah. I've seen, I think, three of them, total -- which is nothing. (I have seen XP crash in a couple of other ways, though; still, not very often, and *nothing* like 98SE.)

> Last time i got it was from a *very*
> bad Bluetooth stack driver.

I didn't try to track down the causes; our XP systems are all just workstations, so I shrugged and rebooted. If it had happened repeatedly, I might have become more curious.

> The other time was when my memory had
> gone bad

Bad RAM will crash absolutely any OS running on a single motherboard. To survive that sort of failure you'd need a redundant clustering solution or something.

> About the RSOD, as i see from the
> screenshot this shows up in the
> bootloader...

At this point, Longhorn doesn't even have a product name yet, so I'm not overly concerned which parts of it are buggy; that's Microsoft's problem. If they get it ironed out and stable by SP1, that's good enough for my purposes.

> It's still a crappy error display.
> It gives no information about what
> might have caused the error.

It doesn't know. That's why you're getting a Screen Of Death (Blue or Red, either way). If it knew what caused the error, it could probably keep the system running (though the process with the error might have to be killed off and, if it's an important system process, restarted). A Screen Of Death happens when the OS really doesn't know what's wrong. At least, that's the way I *think* it works; I'm not familiar with the internals of the OS at the source code level or anything; this is just my interpretation of what I've observed over the years.

Now, the Illegal Operation dialog is another matter; that one *ought* to be able to give you slightly better info, I think. It's triggered by several different well-known classes of application error. At the very least, I would think it ought to be able to heuristically recognize a buffer overrun when it sees one. Also, it should be able to recognize a null-pointer dereferencing. On the other hand, it still can't know everything; e.g., telling the difference between dereferencing a pointer that used to be valid but isn't any more versus invalid pointer arithmetic is almost certainly equivalent to the halting problem.

Just come to face it, Longhorn will be a pile of crap like every other version of Windows was. They develop in completely the wrong way... leaving out serious beta testing until after the product has gone gold? That's crazy and certainly not acceptable in how my company works. We ensure we thoroughly test before we ship. Microsoft has the money to sit and wait for Longhorn to reach maturity. It's allowed too many toddler releases to stumble on the market and cause havoc from viruses and system failures.

In 2000/XP, a BSOD almost always indicates a serious hardware problem. I don't even want to know what could be so much more serious in Longhorn that a higher error level was needed. :-|

A BSOD must be when hardware explodes :D

I actually think RSOD sounds interresting, I was kinda tired of the old BSOD, it was ugly! With the new and "improved" SOD you don't have to stare at a useless blue window, now it's red! That's innovation for you!

This is a "manual trackback".

its windows... enough said

The spelling error is unsurprising - even the HTTP standard has built in spelling errors, and not just in documentation:
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=referer

In response to post 44: how the hell can you call it a hoax when I told EVERYONE how to replicate the error in post 37?

Come on Microsoft...
give us a rainbow of color.... still it is error....

I wonder if Bill Gates will demonstrate this beautiful new 'feature' for us all at the next big trade show in Chicago.. Hmmm

Well of course all you people have not seen BSODs in Windows XP! By default, Windows XP restarts when it gets a BSOD situation. Usually at a BSOD, it is extremely unlikely that you can recover the system, and a restart is the most common option anyway, but it lets the user think that their power clunked out or they have some faulty hardware, rather than making them remember the number one oxymoron at oxymoronlist.com.

Roll Over Me!

I only got a BSOD on 95/98 about every other day.

I only get a BSOD on WinNT/XP when:

a. A power shutdown happens when writing to Registry (leaving corrupt registry), or

b. I run the Sysinternals Bluescreen Screensaver (search google)

c. I use the BSODOnCtrlPrtSc Registry hack to invoke BSOD by pressing Ctrl+PrtScrn (what the heck is SysRq???).

I only get a RSOD when:

a. VGA Drivers/hardware Colors all ****ed up

b. I use BSOD Editor.

---------------

It can also be fake. Here's how:

1. Start a VirtualPC Session under Longhorn.
2. Do either of three things:
A. Download MS qBasic. Run it. Make a program using PRINT, LOCATE, and COLOR commands correctly, then hit F5. Snapshot it.
B. Run WinUAE under Longhorn. Obtain open source kernel version for AmigaOS, edit Guru Meditation/Software Failure section to look like official-ish Windows error, then mess around with something to invoke an error. Run hacked AmigaOS.
C. Open Paint. Resize canvas to 640x480. Background=Red, foreground=DOS Text-ish Grey. Type up the error, making error subject White. Start a Longhorn VirtualPC session. Screenshot the window. Open another Paint window. Paste the window screenshot. Black out the Windows Longhorn screen in the screenshot. Go to the RSOD window, then click Edit>Select all, edit>Copy, then go to Longhorn Screenshot and paste RSOD as if in the session, there. Resize to fit, if needed.

HoverColorChange trick done by putting "a" in greater than/less than brackets before text, greater than, a /, "a", then less than after text.

Great one, men... great error in windoze, but if you see at last two lines of the message, it says "If the problem continues, contact with your system administrator or computer manufacturer". Well done, Redmond's boys... a system administrator can't fix an error at least you open the source code to see what crashes... and the computer manufacturer gives you a guarantee. Won't it be that we have to call to M$ customer phones and say "what have you done with this o.s?"?. It's funny... too funny xDDD

> Oh, you mean like General Protection Fault became Illegal Operation?

A GPF and an Illegal Operation fault are completely seperate beasts. A GPF occurs if a process tries to write data into read-only memory, or other similar errors. An Illegal Operation is when a program contains illegal opcode combinations, usually as a result of executing data.

GPFs are rarely seen nowadays, having been mostly replaced with "Access Violations," which are a different trap but are generally caused by the same programming mistakes.

Yes, I am aware this is an oversimplification. I just wanted to clear up the replyee's misconception.

Whaqt about a Black Screen of Death??

If you reach this screen then your computer is no good anymore and you have to get a new computer. In other words it's completely destroyed and such with a message that says. Fatal Error!!

And a Green Screen of Death????

As someone beat me to above, it looks like the Amiga "Guru Meditation" is back! Needs the blinking/pulsing red border though.

" Amiga equivalent of panic in Unix (sometimes just called a guru or guru event). When the system crashes, a cryptic message of the form “GURU MEDITATION #XXXXXXXX.YYYYYYYY” may appear, indicating what the problem was. An Amiga guru can figure things out from the numbers.

I actually think RSOD sounds interresting, I was kinda tired of the old BSOD, it was ugly! With the new and "improved" SOD you don't have to stare at a useless blue window, now it's red! That's innovation for you!

I actually think RSOD sounds interresting, I was kinda tired of the old BSOD, it was ugly! With the new and "improved" SOD you don't have to stare at a useless blue window, now it's red! That's innovation for you!

First off, i wish I had photoshop too!!! ALSO, i agree with comment 14 exactly! Except anything open source. Their even scared of firefox. Look how the NEW hotmail looks in hotmail. It's gotta say something!

Steps to get rid of any screen of death:
1) move your computer to another desk, and let it run as a server, that if you get a virus you dont care.
2)Make $600. and get a fairly good Mac Mini!
3)Plug it in
4)Turn 'er on, and, say bye-bye to screens of "death".

No viruses, spyware, its mainly open source (with darwin) and its so much more stable. You will be much more happier!

GL, and if you dont switch, dont complain!

sorry for typo

Look how the NEW hotmail looks in hotmail.

should be


Look how the NEW hotmail looks in firefox.

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16 TrackBacks

Listed below are links to blogs that reference this entry: BSOD upgrades to RSOD in Longhorn.

TrackBack URL for this entry: http://joi.ito.com/MT-4.35-en/mt-tb.cgi/3467

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