Creative Commons Blog

Campaign Exclusive: Custom USB Drives & Unreleased Jonathan Coulton Album

The ever innovative Brooklyn-based singer songwriter Jonathan Coulton has teamed up with Creative Commons to release his greatest hits compilation "JoCo Looks Back" on a 1gb custom Creative Commons jump drive to help support our 2008 campaign. If that weren't enough, JoCo and CC have also included all of the unmixed audio tracks for every song on the drive. That's over 700mb of JoCo thing-a-week goodness. Since all of JoCo's music is released under our Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license, this is an incredible opportunity for the public to remix and reuse his fantastic music. Song files are in 320kbps MP3 and unmixed audio tracks are in 256 VBR MP3.

We'll be offering the drives exclusively at our $50 dollar donation level (and above) until December 31st. Also included are a CreativeCommons.net account, an OpenID identity, and a 2008 campaign sticker.

Creative Commons Blog
Commoner Letter #3: Jonathan Coulton

[...]

It's hard to overstate the degree to which CC has contributed to my career as a musician. In 2005 I started Thing a Week, a project in which I recorded a new song every week and released it for free on my website and in a podcast feed, licensing everything with Creative Commons. Over the course of that year, my growing audience started to feed back to me things they had created based on my music: videos, artwork, remixes, card games, coloring books. I long ago lost track of this torrent of fan-made stuff, and of course I'll never know how many people simply shared my music with friends, but there's no question in my mind that Creative Commons is a big part of why I'm now able to make a living this way. Indeed, it's where much of my audience comes from - there are some fan-made music videos on YouTube that have been viewed millions of times. That's an enormous amount of exposure to new potential fans, and it costs me exactly zero dollars.

When you're an artist, it's a wonderful thing to hear from a fan who likes what you do. But it's even more thrilling to see that someone was moved enough to make something brand new based on it - that your creative work has inspired someone to do more creative work, that your little song had a child and that child was a YouTube video that a million people watched. A Creative Commons license is like a joy multiplier. The art you create adds to the world whenever someone appreciates it, but you also get karma credit for every new piece of art it inspires. And around and around. This is my favorite thing about Creative Commons: the act of creation becomes not the end, but the beginning of a creative process that links complete strangers together in collaboration. To me it's a deeply satisfying and beautiful vision of what art and culture can be.

[...]

Thanks so much for this Jonathan and thanks for all of the great thoughts and kind words in the commoner letter.

2 Comments

Loved this post and quoted on my site, but I couldn't figure out how to link a trackback. Does that link automatically eventually?

Sorry, my trackbacks are broken right now. Trying to fix them. Having trouble filtering the spam.

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