Joi Ito's Web

Joi Ito's conversation with the living web.

My blog uses a "by/2.0" Creative Commons license. This means that anyone can use anything from my blog and copy or create derivative works without asking permission as long as they give me attribution. NEC has gotten into blogging and wanted to use the content from my blog. Unfortunately, I write mostly in English. I have tried translating posts myself as well as using a number of volunteer translators. The problem is, translation is not very fun and I would rather write another post in English than spend time translating. The combination of NEC's desire to use my content and my Creative Commons license allows NEC to pay a translator to translate my blog into Japanese and use the content on their blog. I don't get paid, but now my words are available in Japanese too.

NEC tells me that after a six month period, they will release the Japanese content under and Creative Commons by-nc-sa/2.1/jp license which will allow me to copy the the translations back to my blog after this period.

Translations are essential for building bridges between cultures. One big problem is that translation sometimes cost MORE than the cost of writing the original work. It's also more boring. Using CC to allow people to create business models to pay translators seems like a great idea to me. Thanks NEC!

NEC's Japanese Joi Ito's Web

Cory @ Boing Boing Blog
Anti-Starbucks site doesn't use "Starbucks" in name

NPR sez, "'The Delocator' is a site that helps you find independent alternatives to Starbucks in your neighborhood. So why isn't it called the 'Starbucks Delocator'? Because the San Francisco Art Institute was too scared that Starbucks would come through with the corporate smack-down. Of course this renaming means the site won't show up in google when people search for 'Starbucks', and what's the point if people can't discover it? Carrie McLaren is out to change that: she's launched a google campaign to get people to link to it by its real name, the Starbucks Delocator. Take that chilling effects. Now, get your link on!"

Starbucks Delocator Link
(Thanks, NPR and Stay Free Daily!)

Take that!

UPDATE: You can use a company name in the domain name of a non-commercial "sucks" site. via ICANNWatch

UPDATE 2: See also EFF Deep Links for information on the ruling.

I'm meeting some bloggers in Buenos Aires at 20:00 on April 8, 2005. Please take a look at the wiki for more information and sign up if you can come. See you there!

UPDATE: Señor Mariano

The ICANN meeting in Mar del Plata is just about to officially begin. There will be a webcast of the sessions in the main auditorium. There are some interesting issues on the agenda including DNS Security, Domain Name Hijacking and WSIS. Of course the public discussion and the board meeting should also be interesting. You can find the schedule on the web site.

WEBCAST AND REMOTE PARTICIPATION INFORMATION

ALL sessions in the main auditorium can be viewed at:
http://media.icann.org/ramgen/broadcast/argentina.rm.

ALL ccNSO sessions can be viewed at:
http://media.icann.org/ramgen/broadcast/ccnso.rm.

To send questions to the board of directors or if you have question or comments related to the meeting, please send an email to argentina@icann.org.

Just between us, I will have my computer with me and will be on IRC at #joiito on irc.freenode.net during the sessions. I would not recommend IM'ing me on anything other than Shinkuro or Skype if you want to say something to me securely since I'm on an open wifi network.

Cameo
Google & Firefox == Evil & Annoying

I recently did a search at google for "radio shack". To my surprise, I received a cookie setting request from radio shack.com. This had never happened before- and radio shack also happened to be a sponsored link. I did other searches, such as "ford", "sony", and even "girl scouts"- and each time, the top link requested a cookie to be set. Since Girl Scouts did not have a sponsored link- I realised it must only be the top link that sets a cookie. It turned out that Mozilla browsers (that includes firefox) and Google have both enabled prefetch- although it would seem that Google only recently enabled it- as this is a new occurrence. I always verify the setting of cookies- so this makes every google search into an annoying cookie refusal time waste. It would also seem that prefetching is turned on my default in firefox- and is very unintuitive to turn off.

So- for my friends that automatically accept cookies- you are now downloading a page and a cookie nearly every time you use google and firefox together.

And even though I never clicked on their link- and never wanted to visit their site- I'm downloading the top link of my search results to my harddrive every time I do a Google search.

This makes me dislike not only Mozilla- but Google as well.

There is a discussion about this on WebmasterWorld.com as well. This feels annoying and since it's more fun to pick on Google than Microsoft these days, I'm blogging it.