Joi Ito's Web

Joi Ito's conversation with the living web.

fotoblog_alpha
Christian is "Mr. UI" of Nokia. He gave me this cool application yesterday.

Christian Lindholm
Pertti Korhonen, Nokia’s new CTO introduced PhotoBlog for Series 60 in his keynote at ETech in San Diego. This application proof-of-concept is supporting the Atom API enabling users to post to leading blog platforms. The application was developed by Futurice, who is developing a Photblog platform.
This lets you post photos to your TypePad (or any other Atom API compliant) photo album directly from the phone without going through email.

Russell says:
Interesting conference - too bad I wasn't there to get a longer impression, but boy it seemed like there were some serious pecking orders there.
And someone else I know there said this via IM last night:
You are missing some good conferences this week here, although I have come to the conclusion that a lot of the bloggers are pretty pompous.
I'm not sure what to make of that. Pecking orders? Pompous? It bothers me, I guess.
That's odd. I haven't noticed pecking or being pecked. Pompous? Nothing more or less than I would expect. I wonder if I'm missing something? I'm generally fairly sensitive about this sort of stuff. Anyone here at ETech have any specific examples?

I DO think we're talking about blogging too much, but pecking?

Via Yusuf

I just heard from Paul Martino, the CTO and Founder of Tribe.net, that they were working on FOAF and RSS support for Tribe. Cool. There are going to be a lot of issues such as privacy, but I think that having companies like Tribe seriously working on FOAF will bring these issues front and center and make some of these theoretical discussions very concrete and productive.

photo_library_3208Yesterday, Jeff Jarvis introduced us to the Iranian blogger, Pedram Moallemian. Pedram blogs at the eyeranian. He is one of the outspoken Iranians who blogs in English and help us understand what's going on on the incredible number of Persian blogs. He explain that the Persian blogs can be traced to the short explanation written by Hoder at Hoder.com explaining how to use Blogger in Persian. There are now over 100,000 Persian blogs. Most of the blogs are about politics and sex as well as other things like poetry. The suppression of free speech in Iran is one of the explanations for the number of Persian blogs, but the notion that one short page of Persian documentation for Blogger starting this incredible trend is also very important. Many countries and languages probably just need a small seed to create an emergent cascade of blogging adoption.

Jeff writes about an arrested Iranian blogger who was recently freed. Great post with links to other interesting posts about Iranian blogging.

Is this an interesting question? What's the difference between a journal, a diary and a blog?