Joi Ito's Web

Joi Ito's conversation with the living web.

Seemsic has just implemented Creative Commons. According to Loic, it was the most requested feature by the users.

The interface looks super-awesome. Great jobs guys and thanks for supporting the commons!


News of Seesmic + CC startles me at 5AM



Loic and Jon Phillips from CC talk

Joi Ito, Chad Hurley and Loic LeMeur Join TechCrunch50 As Startup Judges.

Its hard to believe, but TechCrunch50 is less than two months away. We're knee-deep in the applications right now, and I can tell you it is hard to cull them down. It is really impressive how many good new startup ideas are out there.

Today, we are announcing our latest line-up of TechCrunch50 Experts: Joi Ito, Chad Hurley and Loic LeMeur. They will join Marc Andreessen, Marc Benioff, Mark Cuban, Chris DeWolf, Marissa Mayer, and others on our panel of experts in judging and advising the presenting TechCrunch50 startups.

[...]

Michael Arrington
I'd been bumping into Michael here and there on the Net, but recently got to know him in person at FOO Camp. The whole TechCrunch phenomenon has interested me and having met Michael, it continues to be curious and interesting. ;-)

Anyway, I hope to get a chance to get to see a bunch of cool new startups and peer into the inner workings of the Crunch-machine through the process.

Hope to see you all there.

skitched-20080715-053206.jpg

I just got this from Susan Crawford today.

OneWebDay, http://onewebday.org, is an Earth Day for the Internet that happens each September 22 all around the world. Two years ago, I had fun on OneWebDay making some videos with Bob Pepper in Tokyo.

OneWebDay's theme this year is online participation in democracy, and I plan to use OneWebDay as an opportunity to speak out about the power of the Net to help all of us expand the idea of citizenship and be part of day-to-day democracy.

Who knows where I'll be on Sept. 22. There will be a network of OneWebDay events across the U.S. and around the globe. To catch up with what's happening go to the OneWebDay site, http://onewebday.org. To start thinking about possible actions you can take on 9/22, go to http://www.onewebday.org/base/index.php/OneWebDay_in_a_box.

In addition to Susan being one of the coolest people around, I think OneWebDay is a really important way to remind ourselves that we need to do stuff to keep the Net open and remind everyone about how important the web and the open Internet are for open society.

I'll be participating from wherever I am. I looks like I'll either be in Dubai or Tokyo on the 22nd.

Starting today, I'm teaching an intensive class on Digital Journalism at the Keio University Graduate School of Media Design. Although I've taught courses at trade schools and classes at universities, this is the first real "course" that I've taught at a university. I'm looking forward to it, but am also a bit nervous.

There are eleven students signed up so far, which is fairly small, but probably easier and more fun for me.

The course is packed into a single week, starting with 2 X 90 minute classes for the next three days then a single 90 minute class on Friday. I decided to make this workshop-like and spend the first half of each of the long days talking and discussing and the second half more like a lab where we actually do stuff.

I'm going to spend the first day doing an overview of journalism, blogs and various tools and will try to get the students online and using some of the tools on the first day. I'll divide the students into teams and have each team work come up with a story that they want to work on.

On the second day, we'll focus on researching our stories. I'm going to require at least one online interview with someone so setting that up will also probably happen on this day.

The third day will be focused on producing the story and publishing it. I'll let the students use what ever mix of media they want to use including photography, video, audio and text. I'll also let them choose where and how they want to publish, but I will require some sort of ability for participation of the public. (BTW, this is where all of YOU come in.)

On the final day, I'll have the students discuss and critique their works.

I hope this turns out to be interesting for me, the students and you. I'll be blogging updates here and in other places like Twitter. We're going to be using Google Sites for main page of the class.

If you have any suggestions on stories, tools and other things we should consider, please comment here or on the Google Sites page.

View from my tent

The FOO in FOO Camp stands for "Friend of O'Reilly". That's Tim, not Bill. Anyway, every year, he invites a smallish group of people to Sebastopol to hang out and talk. One problem is that since Tim has a largish group of friends, not everyone gets invited and this sometimes causes hurt feelings. However, I think that there is definitely a maximum size that you can make a meeting like this before it becomes less productive and I think it's just right.

So thanks to Tim and the O'Reilly crew for making tough choices, organizing everything and throwing an amazingly fun and useful meeting.

The last time that I attended FOO was in 2005. I stayed in a hotel nearby and had a great time, but I definitely had more fun this year camping and staying in my tent. If nothing else, the ability to ignore my jet lag and join the 24 hour conversation whenever I wanted was a lot of fun.

Although the sessions were great, catching up with old friends and making ones was the most fun. Also, hearing about the super-secret, face-to-face only stuff was useful too. ;-)

I've posted my images in a Flickr set. I think that the calibration on my laptop is possibly screwed up and doing some of this work in a yellow tent didn't help. I'll try to fix some of messed up colors. Apologies to those who look over saturated.