Joi Ito's Web

Joi Ito's conversation with the living web.

From my column in Japan Inc.:

  • Participated in a brunch for John Gage with the usual suspects.
  • Rounded up some of the local BeOS gurus and gave a demo of some of the cool apps they've developed to Steve Sakoman.
  • Had dinner with Keigo Oyamada.
  • Was interviewed by Bloomberg Magazine.
  • Had dinner with Irving Wladawsky-Berger, VP of technology and strategy at the Enterprise Systems Group of IBM.

  • From my column in Japan Inc.

    PARTICIPATED IN A BRUNCH for John Gage with the usual suspects. One of my favorite speakers and visionaries, John is the chief science officer and one of the founders of Sun. He's also on my advisory board. He's always flying around the world saying smart things and evangelizing the latest technology. This time he showed us a bunch of Java-enabled prototypes of various devices, including cell phones and a hacked Sony videocamera with a backdoor to upload Java applets.

    ・Rounded up some of the local BeOS gurus and gave a demo of some of the cool apps they've developed to Steve Sakoman. Steve cofounded Be after leaving Apple and is currently the COO and visionary, along with the world-famous Jean-Louis Gassee. We showed them that the Be community in Japan is alive and well, with some knock-your-socks-off real-time multimedia stuff that only the BeOS can do. [Editor's note: Ito is on the board of Be.]

    ・Participated in another mumei no kai meeting. The host this time was Takeo Hori, chairman of Hori Productions. We ate at Imajin in Akasaka, a famous restaurant I occasionally use for important dinners. I learned that Mr. Hori actually owns the restaurant. The guest speaker was Tsuguhiko Kadokawa, president of the large publisher Kadokawa Shoten. The takeaway for me was that magazine publishing, newspaper, and broadcast TV are all approximately $20 billion markets in Japan. The theory is that in Japan all forms of mass media become $20 billion markets. Will the Internet follow suit?

    ・Met with my landlord. I tried to convince him that he should give me space in his house to put my 19-inch rack in exchange for being allowed to use the T1 line that I was going to be installing. I think it was difficult for him to understand exactly what kind of pervert would need so much bandwidth, but I tried to convert him by showing him some streaming video. I don't think he was convinced. In the meantime, I'm trying to get him addicted by having NTT contact him about participating in a broadband wireless experiment as a monitor. This bandwidth business is a lot like the drug business: you have to get people addicted before they realize that they need mo-mo-mo-more bandwidth.

    ・Had dinner with Keigo Oyamada. Keigo and I grew up next door to each other when I was attending the American School in Japan. He started out as a problem kid but is now a huge star, having cofounded Flipper Guitar and then Cornelius. He has an amazing following, and his fans are devout. He gave me a great hint about the future of music distribution: he told me that he created several different color packages for the same tape, and found that many of his fans bought the same song in all of the colors. He spends a lot of his time on merchandising and packaging. I think the future of the music business is in live events and merchandising, just as motion pictures is now about leveraging all of the ancillary markets.

    ・Was interviewed by Bloomberg Magazine. The photographer was Tom Wagner, who shot me for Business Week before. I can usually keep the Japanese photographers from making me do weird poses or "image photos," but Tom always tries to get me to do strange things. This time he made me sit back-to-back with Paul Slawson, managing director of Whitney and Co., our investor. I wonder if most CEOs like having their picture taken. My parents taught me to be kenkyo, or understated, whenever possible, and posing makes me feel uncomfortable.

    ・Had dinner with Irving Wladawsky-Berger, VP of technology and strategy at the Enterprise Systems Group of IBM. Quite the visionary, he said something that truly resonated with me: IBM is primarily a research company; it figured out that bipolar computing would be replaced by CMOS and hence survived a big shift. The development of the Internet and Linux (which IBM has embraced), he said, is another "comet come to wipe out the dinosaurs," and only research-strong companies with vision will survive. Keeping an eye on science and technology to build one's roadmap of the future is my own philosophy as well.

    From my column in Japan Inc.

    - Gave my thoughts about NTT's interconnect fees to Wendy Cutler, assistant to the US Trade Representative who was in town negotiating the fees for telcos trying to reach Japan.
    - Was on a panel at an Israeli venture business forum and was impressed with the presentations.
    - Went to the police station in Chiba to confirm that the person in the OVIS photo was me.
    - Met with Kazuo Asada, the president of NTT West.
    - John Markoff, a good friend and my favorite technology journalist (from The New York Times) came to Japan for the first time and I took him and Calvin Sims (the Tokyo correspondent) out to eat Japanese cured beef tongue.

    From my column in Japan Inc.

    Gave my thoughts about NTT's interconnect fees to Wendy Cutler, assistant to the US Trade Representative who was in town negotiating the fees for telcos trying to reach Japan.

    I hadn't thought much about it when I met her, but, in hindsight, I think my opinion is that voice is going to be part of the Internet and will eventually become free. Internet connection is deregulated in Japan and the more important issues are the technical and regulatory ones around local loop and right of way. I think that deregulation of the wireless spectrum and the ability to lay new fiber and coaxial cable is much more important. People still seem to think that the Net is something that happens on top of voice. It's the other way around.

    ・Was on a panel at an Israeli venture business forum and was impressed with the presentations. Israel has leveraged technical assets developed in its military and has been very successful launching global businesses. The entrepreneurs seem to be much more innovative and driven than many of the entrepreneurs I meet in Japan. I hope that I start seeing more of the globally focused and high-quality deals in Japan that seem to be quite common in Israel.

    ・Went to the police station in Chiba to confirm that the person in the OVIS photo was me. OVIS is the Japanese nationwide network of speed-trap cameras that take photos of speeders and allow police to issue tickets based on them. This one caught me on the way back from the airport going 144 km in a 100-km zone.

    Oops. My radar detector didn't go off.

    I found out later that the new one that caught me had induction sensors in the road and did not use radar to detect the speed. The friendly policeman asked me to identify myself as the person in the photo and explained the exact position of the camera and told me to be careful next time when traveling past it.

    On the topic of police cameras, there is another, more sneaky camera system which many drivers mistake for OVIS cameras. These are the N-System cameras. They are not tracking your speed, but photographing all the plates that pass by and sending this information to a database that matches them against cars that have APBs out on them. In this way, the police know where everyone's car is being driven. This system was instrumental in catching many of the Aum Cult members. It has recently come under quite a bit of scrutiny, however, because it was deployed without Diet approval.

    Anyway, I think Japan and the UK probably have the most police cameras in your face, although the US is close and the police don't have to install all of the cameras since companies have so many installed anyway. This is all going to get very scary once face recognition software is widely deployed. Maybe I'll start a ski mask company ノ

    ・Met with Kazuo Asada, the president of NTT West. I explained that the NTT subsidiaries were all very confusing to me. They compete aggressively with each other, yet have a central HR function. I can't tell whether they are well organized or not. In any event, they are still the key to the success or failure of the IT revolution in Japan, and I urged Mr. Asada to work with startups in trying to create a community of companies to get things going here.

    ・John Markoff, a good friend and my favorite technology journalist (from The New York Times) came to Japan for the first time and I took him and Calvin Sims (the Tokyo correspondent) out to eat Japanese cured beef tongue.

    Markoff was the first to write about me in a major newspaper, and was also the person who gave me a disk that had the first PPP Internet access utility that I ever used. I like Markoff because, even though he is a journalist, he is above all things a geek. He also loves network games, although I always kill him when we play.

    From my column in Japan Inc.:

    - Had dinner with Yukihiro Kayama, the CEO of EC One.
    - Went to see the new Lawson team.
    - Was invited to US Ambassador Tom Foley's residence to meet a group of people from Washington State visiting on a trade mission.
    - Saw Shoichiro Irimajiri, the CEO of Sega who recently stepped down from his post as president.
    - Oki Matsumoto of Monex called me up the other day and said that the Bit Valley folks wanted to have a small seminar to talk seriously about the issues facing entrepreneurs today.
    - Now that Infoseek Japan is a subsidiary of Disney, we have access to some of the perks of being a Disney company.
    - Had breakfast with Leonard Liu.
    - Spent some time with Teruyoshi Katsurada, the former EVP of Dentsu [the biggest ad agency in Japan], who is now heading the association of advertising agencies thinking about the future of the Internet.
    - Met the founder of Wit Capital, Andrew D. Klein.
    - Was commended by the Ministry of Posts and Telecom for my years of service to develop new policies and for supporting the proliferation of Internet businesses.
    - Had dinner with the CEO of Yahoo Japan, Masahiro Inoue, and Michio Iwaki of Shiseido, who is the chair of the Web committee of the Advertisers Association.

    From my column in Japan Inc.

    Had dinner with Yukihiro Kayama, the CEO of EC One. Mr. Kayama is a unique guy with a deep understanding of technology. EC One is one of the premiere producers of Enterprise Java Beans. (No, not coffee beans.) While at Mitsubishi Corporation, Mr. Kayama launched various projects that have been turning into huge gains for Mitsubishi. He recently retired to start EC One, which has also become a very successful venture. I think he is one of the few senior technology-focused people who is very successful and has multiple, multimillion-dollar home runs under his belt. I look forward to working on something with him soon.

    剛Went to see the new Lawson team. There were Mitsubishi people everywhere. Mitsubishi recently made a major investment in Lawson and has sent in an army of people to help Lawson dot-comify. I am very interested in seeing how the corporate cultures of Lawson and Mitsubishi merge and what kind of culture comes out of it.
    I still think that the dot-com stuff should be asset-carve-outs into new ventures rather than joint ventures of big companies. In any case, I wish the Lawson team well and hope they can keep the good stuff and move ahead quickly.

    剛Was invited to US Ambassador Tom Foley's residence to meet a group of people from Washington State visiting on a trade mission. I hadn't been there since Haru Reischauer's memorial services, so it was impressive as usual. It was a huge group of many of the usual cast of characters and I wasn't sure what I was doing there. I said hi to Kay Nishi, who I hadn't seen for quite a while. Tom Foley was surrounded by a mob of people, so I decided to leave without talking to anyone else.

    剛Saw Shoichiro Irimajiri, the CEO of Sega who recently stepped down from his post as president. I can't disclose what we talked about, but it was enjoyable as always. Mr. Irimajiri is a junior high school classmate of my father's and I had heard about him many times. Mr. Irimajiri is someone I truly respect. He spent 20 years at Honda as an engineer and a manager and was able to move to the game industry and produce amazing results. His character, understanding of engineering issues, and ability to manage are the kinds of attributes that any Internet company should be looking for. One thing Mr. Irimajiri said that stuck with me was that although people say one loses the ability to design engines as one ages, the last engine he built was his best one. He said that it was because he just listened to his customers and designed it as they wanted. I recently read the Cluetrain Manifesto, which states that the markets are now conversations and the market will tell you what it needs. From Mr. Irimajiri's story, this is nothing new.

    剛Oki Matsumoto of Monex called me up the other day and said that the Bit Valley folks wanted to have a small seminar to talk seriously about the issues facing entrepreneurs today. He promised me that it wouldn't be the Big Bubble Bit Valley situation. Anyway, although it wasn't bubble, it was big. I think there were over a thousand people at the event, held at Aoyama Gakuin. The session started with an address from Taichi Sakaiya, director general of the Economic Planning Agency. He talked about the shift from the mass production economy to the economy of information. It was very cogent, but it sounded like he had given this address many times. He ended by giving a plug about the Internet Exposition that is being organized out of the prime minister's office, ending the speech on a much less lofty tone than it started. My presentation was followed by Oki Matsumoto's. I set myself up for a major disagreement by saying that I thought money in itself had no value, but that it was just a tool used for distributing resources and creating value. I also said that the markets were stupid and that the current Internet valuations had very little to do with the actual value of the companies. I said that everyone needed to learn how to manage and use money, but that the best companies were going to be built by people who focus on creating companies with real value. Oki disagreed with me in several areas. You can listen to our speeches and discussion at http://japan.internet.com/santa maria/japancom.html. The panel discussion was moderated by the writer Yasuo Tanaka.

    剛Now that Infoseek Japan is a subsidiary of Disney, we have access to some of the perks of being a Disney company. We invited all of our partners to a dinner at Club 33, the secret restaurant inside of Disneyland where you can see the electric parade and the fireworks while feasting on good food and wine in a fancy restaurant. We all got books of Club 33 matches with our names embossed on them, but they spelled my name wrong.

    剛Had breakfast with Leonard Liu. Leonard was an ex-IBM exec who became famous as the CEO who took Acer International and made it a global company. Later he was the turnaround CEO for companies such as Cadence and Walker Interactive. He is now the chairman of ASE, a large semiconductor company. When I was co-CEO of Digital Garage, Leonard invested in the company. He sat down one afternoon and looked through our numbers. He was able to tell me which groups needed restructuring and what critical decision I needed to make by when. Everything he said turned out to be correct. He is one of the greatest CEOs I know and one of my mentors. I asked him to join the advisory board of Neoteny and help us with our China strategy.

    剛Spent some time with Teruyoshi Katsurada, the former EVP of Dentsu [the biggest ad agency in Japan], who is now heading the association of advertising agencies thinking about the future of the Internet. Although you might expect a retired Dentsu guy to be old fashioned, on the contrary, he has a very good understanding of the basic nature of media and the future. In our discussion, he said that he thought it was time that "time" was given back to the user, since it was taken away from them by broadcast media. He felt that with the users back in power, it was necessary for ad agencies to look at a completely new model for advertising and that it was possible it would be a very different business model for them once they lose control of users' time.

    剛Met the founder of Wit Capital, Andrew D. Klein. He is well known for having founded the microbrewery Spring Street Brewing Company, which he took public using the first Web-based trading system that he developed. Andrew is famous for always dressing casually, and I was not disappointed. They have an operation in Japan. I look forward to them forging ahead and pushing the envelope as they have done in the United States.

    剛Was commended by the Ministry of Posts and Telecom for my years of service to develop new policies and for supporting the proliferation of Internet businesses. I wonder what that means? I did ask them whether accepting this award meant that I couldn't say bad things about NTT or the MPT. They assured me that was not the case and said there were "no strings attached." So I decided to accept it. The whole affair was rather nationalistic and interesting. There was a Japanese flag next to a flag with a big red postal mark. There was a bonsai on stage, where myself and several other people in other categories received awards, kind of like a high school graduation.

    剛Had dinner with the CEO of Yahoo Japan, Masahiro Inoue, and Michio Iwaki of Shiseido, who is the chair of the Web committee of the Advertisers Association. I had to apologize for the silly Infoseek Japan ads that make fun of Yahoo. I'm probably going to have to apologize again, since we're going to keep doing them.

    - Had a meeting with Oki Matsumoto of Monex about how he figured out and got approval for a method to get around the サ0,000 par value stock issue and allow companies to issue as many shares as they want.
    - Saw Hiroshi Mikitani for the first time since the IPO of his company, Rakuten, soared to a multibillion dollar valuation.
    - Participated in the first meeting of the MITI study group on corporate statute and what needs to be changed to help venture businesses and the New Economy move forward.
    - Had dinner with my sister, Keiko Ochiai, and Kotaro Yamamoto and talked about the women's movement in Japan, as well the organic foods movement.
    - Went to Zenginkyo (The All Japan Bank Association) to have them disclose my public credit records to me to try to figure out why I had trouble getting a new credit card.
    - Spent a day with Frank Boosman and Steven Sakoman of Be Inc. They showed us their Internet appliance prototypes, which were extremely impressive.
    - Had a meeting with my contact at the Tokyo Metropolitan Police, superintendent Hirotsugu Mikami, "the man" at the High Tech Crime Response Group.

    From my column in Japan Inc.

    Had a meeting with Oki Matsumoto of Monex about how he figured out and got approval for a method to get around the ・50,000 par value stock issue and allow companies to issue as many shares as they want. Monex will be helping companies do this and will also be helping them let the shares be sold to online customers to create diversity and liquidity.

    ・Saw Hiroshi Mikitani for the first time since the IPO of his company, Rakuten, soared to a multibillion dollar valuation. He seemed quite the same: confident, happy, practical. I think he's one of the first MBA types to successfully build and take public a Japanese Internet company. Most Net outfits in Japan had been sales/cashflow-driven with CEOs who had more street smarts than education, and I think many had doubts as to whether consultant/banker/MBA types could really build companies.

    ・Participated in the first meeting of the MITI study group on corporate statute and what needs to be changed to help venture businesses and the New Economy move forward. Mr. Norihiko Ishiguro, the trailblazing section-head of the Industrial Policy Bureau, was the force behind this study group. He's pushing forward very important changes in some of the legacy corporate practices and statutes that are holding us back. Recently he made a new law that allows certain companies in new business sectors to be exempt from some of the more menacing legacy regulations. (Neoteny was one of the first companies to receive this exemption/approval.) This new study group is an attempt to make changes generally. I think everyone should back Mr. Ishiguro in this effort since it's a rather valiant attempt to move things forward and will inevitably get a lot of push-back from some of the more conservative elements in the Japanese bureaucracy.

    ・Had dinner with my sister, Keiko Ochiai, and Kotaro Yamamoto and talked about the women's movement in Japan, as well the organic foods movement. Ms. Ochiai is well known for her shop Crayon House, which has tons of cool stuff about child rearing, as well as a bookstore with very progressive women's books. Listening to Keiko and her friends talk about the community gave me confidence that the consumer-activist and women's communities were alive and well in Japan, and that by using the Net they could expand their reach to really make an impact on society.

    ・Went to Zenginkyo (The All Japan Bank Association) to have them disclose my public credit records to me to try to figure out why I had trouble getting a new credit card. They told me that my credit record was clean. Later, I went digging through my less official routes and found that the credit card companies had records about the purchasing patterns of my housemates and that this was impacting my credit. This made me even more confident about my prediction that eventually people will realize they don't want to spew their data into cyberspace for any large entity to compile profiles from. Privacy will be one of the most important issues over the next few years.

    ・Spent a day with Frank Boosman and Steven Sakoman of Be Inc. They showed us their Internet appliance prototypes, which were extremely impressive. They're getting a lot more traction in this space than they had in the desktop arena. They have a shot at becoming the OS of choice for Net appliances, as well as for home broadband stuff.

    ・Had a meeting with my contact at the Tokyo Metropolitan Police, superintendent Hirotsugu Mikami, "the man" at the High Tech Crime Response Group. He has spun up a sizable team and tells me they are quite busy these days. The difficulty from the policing side is that the police are divided into prefectural stations, managed by the National Police Agency, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Police, which actually has the most resources. It's often difficult for the police to know the physical location of a crime, and currently the Tokyo Metropolitan Police have to manage investigations in other prefectures. So the next time a hacker breaks into your fortress and transfers all your money to a Bahaman Bank account, don't call your local koban, call superintendent Mikami.

    From my column in Japan Inc.:

    - Did an interview for Hotwired Japan with Taiga Matsuyama, one of the founders of the Bit Valley Association.
    - Gave a talk at the Financial Supervisory Agency about my thoughts on the future of financial services on the Net.
    - A group from the Kellog School of Business visited our offices and we had a chat about venture businesses in Japan.
    - Attended a meeting of "Mumei No Kai" or "the gathering of the unknown people."
    - Met Michael Dell of Dell Computer.
    - Did a discussion-style interview with Jiro Kokuryo from the Keio Business School and Mr. Shoichiro Iwata, the president of Askul, for the Economic Planning Agency's magazine.
    - Several gentlemen from the French Embassy visited to talk about collaborating with French entrepreneurs.
    - Went to the birthday party of Reiko Okutani, president of The R.
    Flew to Linz, Austria, via Frankfurt, Germany, to participate in the jury for the .Net category of Prix Ars Electronica.
    - Was on the Japan receiving committee for the Dalai Lama's visit to Japan and got to sit at the head table in front of his holiness.
    - Received a brand-new Latitude laptop from Michael Dell and an IBM Workpad from Takuma Otoshi, the president of IBM Japan.

    From my column in Japan Inc.

    Did an interview for Hotwired Japan with Taiga Matsuyama, one of the founders of the Bit Valley Association. We talked about NPOs and my theory of NPOs and online communities forming into powerful enough organizations to buy out companies and infrastructure. I always enjoy our discussions because Taiga is very quick to catch on to new ideas and has the kind of young energy that I think everyone associates with Net pioneers. I think he is grappling with the task of trying to guide the whole Bit Valley phenomenon in the direction that he originally had hoped it would take since it is becoming rather frothy these days.

    Gave a talk at the Financial Supervisory Agency about my thoughts on the future of financial services on the Net. I think they wanted me to talk about my favorite financial sites, but I ended up talking about data havens, financial cryptography, online casinos, the end of the nation-state, and other rather non-social ideas (from their point of view), but it did spark some interesting discussion. Also bashed them for letting financial institutions get away with extremely irresponsible things such as the current debit cards. The debits cards that are being touted as a sort of cash card/credit card are in fact very easy to forge and are not insured. If someone has their card copied or stolen, the thief can steal all of the cash out of an account at the risk of the account owner. There was approximately $90 million in reported fraud losses in ordinary credit cards last year. These debit cards represent a huge risk to society.

    A group from the Kellog School of Business visited our offices and we had a chat about venture businesses in Japan. I told them that business school is not the place to be if one spoke Japanese and was motivated to become an MBA. The opportunity in Japan now is a once-in-a-lifetime one not worth wasting several years to "get ready" for.

    Attended a meeting of "Mumei No Kai" or "the gathering of the unknown people." The regular members of this meeting include Makoto Naruke (former president of Microsoft); Muneaki Masuda, CEO of CCC/Tsutaya; Hideo Sawada, president of HIS; Kotaro Higuchi, former chairman of Asahi Beer; Takeo Hori of Hori Productions; Seiji Tsutumi of Season; and others. It's kind of a combination of the "young business leaders" and the "old business leaders" and it provides an opportunity for many of us to share thoughts and ideas very candidly. Mr. Higuchi talked about his thoughts on the future of Japan. It was a very enlightening discussion. Mr. Higuchi gave everyone Issei Miyake neckties, of which he always has a huge number in his car. He's a good friend of Mr. Miyake and always gives them to his guests.

    Met Michael Dell of Dell Computer. I felt like I knew him since I see his face all the time. Dell, like everyone else, is looking at the private equity opportunities in Japan, and Dell appears to be very aggressive and fast. I think that Dell's focus on creating an efficient organization without any waste may allow it to give advice to startups on supply chain management and cost performance.

    Did a discussion-style interview with Jiro Kokuryo from the Keio Business School and Mr. Shoichiro Iwata, the president of Askul, for the Economic Planning Agency's magazine. We talked about the same future-of-Japan stuff, but Jiro gave me new things to think about, including the notion of the IT revolution being to communication what mass production was to physical production. It is the scalability of communication. Having just read the Cluetrain Manifesto, the notion of the scaling of communication causing a power shift as significant as the shift from land to capital when we went from an agricultural to an industrial society was interesting. We are probably moving from a capital-centric society to a trust or non-capitalizable asset-centric society (think Linux). Anyway, my business guys hate it when I talk about things money can't buy, but I think that's the ball we all need to keep our eye on.

    Several gentlemen from the French Embassy visited to talk about collaborating with French entrepreneurs. We happen to have several French speakers on our team and told them we were excited by the idea. I think one thing that many Net ventures in the US are not good at its globalization. I think a federation of companies helping to globalize companies is necessary. Now more than half of the Internet is outside of the US and it is growing more quickly outside of the US. I don't think Americans understand this, but I guess we don't have to tell them.

    Went to the birthday party of Reiko Okutani, president of The R. She had just turned 50. There was quite an impressive turnout of industrial leaders. Makoto Naruke was the only one there who wasn't wearing a suit. I thought that was some sort of symbolic thing since he left Microsoft, but he told me he'd just returned from Tibet and had forgotten about the party until it was too late.

    Flew to Linz, Austria, via Frankfurt, Germany, to participate in the jury for the .Net category of Prix Ars Electronica. This is my sixth year on the jury, which I have been on since the category started. This year we had over 200 entries to look through in two days. Ars Electronica is over 20 years old and grants awards to artists in areas that involve new technologies. There is a festival in the fall where all the artists and many other people get together to discuss the future of technology, society, and art. Other than the Net, awards are given to Computer Animation, Computer Music, Under 19 Years Old, and Interactive Art. Last year, our jury caused quite a stir in both the art community and the free software community when we gave the award to Linus Torvalds for causing the Linux community to happen. We held that it was his aesthetics and imagination that created the community and that the community was a work of art that embodied many of the criteria that we associate with the category: distributed, self-organizing, can only be done on the Net, community building.

    Was on the Japan receiving committee for the Dalai Lama's visit to Japan and got to sit at the head table in front of his holiness. He was looking into everyone's eyes and smiling a great smile. He gave a great speech, starting off by talking about the graying hairs in his nose. ;-)

    Received a brand-new Latitude laptop from Michael Dell and an IBM Workpad from Takuma Otoshi, the president of IBM Japan. Thanks!