Joi Ito's conversation with the living web.

April 2004 Archives

Interview in The Tech with Jack Valenti »

There's a short interview in MIT's The Tech newpaper with Jack Valenti about DMCA. I'm glad that Jack is still willing to have discussions like this. This is what I meant when I said that I think Jack should be respected. Even if you don't agree with him, he's still willing to try to discuss his position with you. via Creative Commons weblog...

Getting asymmetrical on the asymmetrical »

The Scotsman Mystery group wage war on Sadr's militia In a deadly expression of feelings that until now were kept quiet, a group representing local residents is said to have killed at least five militiamen in the last four days. The murders are the first sign of organised Iraqi opposition to Sadr’s presence and come amid simmering discontent at the havoc their lawless presence has wreaked. The group calls itself the Thulfiqar Army, after a twin-bladed sword said to be used by the Shiite martyr Imam Ali, to whom Najaf’s vast central mosque is dedicated. Residents say leaflets bearing...

Reaction of Japan to the Japanese Hostages in Iraq »

Several people have asked me to comment on an article in the NYT about the reaction of to the Japanese people to the three Japanese taken hostage in Iraq. The article describes how everyone including the politicians in Japan are angry at the hostages for causing trouble to the Japanese government and being irresponsible. There are many conflicting reports about whether they were reckless or not and what their motives were so I won't comment on that. I also don't feel strongly personally on this issue so I'm not going to make a judgmental point either. What I would like...

Does Google help governments censor results? »

Wired Magazine, January 2003Brin was no expert on international diplomacy. So he ordered a half-dozen books about Chinese history, business, and politics on Amazon.com and splurged on overnight shipping. He consulted with Schmidt, Page, and David Drummond, Google's general counsel and head of business development, then put in a call to tech industry doyenne Esther Dyson for advice and contacts. Google has no offices in China, so Brin enlisted go-betweens to get the message to Chinese authorities that Google would be very interested in working out a compromise to restore access. "We didn't want to do anything rash," Brin says....

Google S-1 »

Google's S-1 is online. (Warning. Big file.) via CNET...

US snipers shooting kids in Falluja? »

Story about US snipers shooting kids and pinning down the ambulance and evacuation services in Falluja. Here's a photo of a dead baby on Al Jazeera. Is there any coverage of this in other media? via Ryuichi Sakamoto...

New LinkedIn feature to prevent SNAM »

I've been getting a lot of SNAM (Social Network Spam) so I'm happy to hear that LinkedIn has a new flag that you can set that prevents you from receiving invitation from people who are not in your address book. It's a bit snobbly, but it prevents you from having to turn down invitation requests from people you don't know. On LinkedIn, I generally don't accept invitations from people I don't know because the purpose of the network is to refer people to each other and you can't really write a reference for someone you don't know. Although this probably...

World Economic Forum weblog »

The World Economic Forum has a weblog now. via Loic...

Scambaiting »

Scambaiting is the sport of baiting and messing with 419 scammers. via Thomas...

TypePad France »

Welcome online TypePad France!...

Partisan blogging »

When I have posted particularly anti-Bush or partisan views, many people have complained in the comments or by email. Some of the most intelligent comments on my blog have come from conservatives and some of the most stupid from liberals. In order to keep some of the more intelligent conservatives involved in the dialog, I've tried to generally steer clear taking strong stands on the war in Iraq and on the presidential election. I thought about it and I've decided that this is stupid. I don't want Bush to be re-elected and I think going into Iraq was wrong. I...

Orkut datamining »

Somewhat scary, but pretty interesting Orkut datamining. An Orkut density map and a Orkut Personal Network GeoMapper. Here's a map of my network. It doesn't seem to map my complete network. It's also too bad it's not global yet. Via Sanford...

Seth Godin on Differentiation and Segmentation »

Seth Godin on why it's not about Differentiation and Segmentation....

WSJ mention of my $3500 T-Mobile bill »

I'm not sure how I feel about being in the WSJ for my stupidity, but I agreed in order to emphasis my point to more people....

E-Voting Machines Get Official Thumbs Down »

Mercury NewsE-voting panel wants to dump troubled system SACRAMENTO - Less than seven months before the presidential election, an advisory panel Thursday unanimously recommended an unprecedented ban of touch-screen election equipment used in four California counties. The panel also urged Secretary of State Kevin Shelley to seek a criminal or civil investigation into the conduct of Diebold Election Systems, the Ohio-based firm that manufactured the troubled voting system.Yes! We really need to get rid of e-voting. It's such a bad idea and until now, I thought we were losing the battle. We need to make sure this doesn't end with...

Business 2.0 article on Creative Commons »

Giving It Away (for Fun and Profit) - By Andy Raskin, May 2004 Issue, Business 2.0 Good article about Creative Commons and the business case....

Lomography »

I recently discovered lomography. I think it fits very naturally with the spirit of moblogging.Lomographic Society InternationalThe 10 Golden Rules of Lomography 1 - take your camera everywhere you go 2 - use it any time - day and night 3 - lomography is not an interference in your life, but a part of it 4 - try the shot from the hip 5 - approach the objects of your lomographic desire as close as possible 6 - don't think (Wiliam Firebrace) 7 - be fast 8 - you don't have to know beforehand what you capture on film 9...

Genocide in Sudan »

There is genocide going on in Sudan. A must read essay about it and how you can help. via Jim Moore...

Essay about trends »

Several crucial shifts in technology are emerging that will drastically affect the relationship between users and technology in the near future. Wireless Internet is becoming ubiquitous and economically viable. Internet capable devices are becoming smaller and more powerful.Alongside technological shifts, new social trends are emerging. Users are shifting their attention from packaged content to social information about location, presence and community. Tools for identity, trust, relationship management and navigating social networks are becoming more popular. Mobile communication tools are shifting away from a 1-1 model, allowing for increased many-to-many interactions; such a shift is even being used to permit new forms of democracy and citizen participation in global dialog.While new technological and social trends are occurring, it is not without resistance, often by the developers and distributors of technology and content. In order to empower the consumer as a community member and producer, communication carriers, hardware manufacturers and content providers must understand and build models that focus less on the content and more on the relationships. Smaller fasterComputing started out as large mainframe computers, software developers and companies “time sharing” for slices of computing time on the large machines. The mini-computer was cheaper and smaller, allowing companies and labs to own their own computers. The mini computer allowed a much greater number of people to have access to computers and even use them in real time. The mini computer lead to a burst in software and networking technologies. In the early 80’s, the personal computer increased the number of computers by an order of magnitude and again, led to an explosion in new software and technology while lowering the cost even more. Console gaming companies proved once again that unit costs could be decreased significantly by dramatically increasing the number of units sold. Today, we have over a billion cell phones in the market. There are tens of millions camera phones. The incredible number of these devices has continued to lower the unit cost of computing as well as devices imbedded in these devices such as small cameras. High end phones have the computing power of the personal computers of the 80’s and the game consoles of the 90’s.History repeats with WiFiThere are parallels in the history of communications and computing. In the 1980’s the technology of packet switched networks became widely deployed. Two standards competed. X.25 was a packet switched network technology being promoted by CCITT (a large, formal international standards body) and the telephone companies. It involved a system run by telephone companies including metered tariffs and multiple bilateral agreements between carriers to hook up.Concurrently, universities and research labs were promoting TCP/IP and the Internet opportunity for loosely organized standards meetings being operated with flat rate tariffs and little or no agreements between the carriers. People just connected to the closest node and everyone agreed to freely carry traffic for others.There were several “free Internet” services such as “The Little Garden” in San Francisco. Commercial service providers, particularly the telephone company operators such as SprintNet tried to shut down such free services by threatening not to carry this free traffic.Eventually, large ISPs began providing high quality Internet connectivity and finally the telephone companies realized that the Internet was the dominant standard and shutdown or acquired the ISPs.A similar trend is happening in wireless data services. GPRS is currently the dominant technology among mobile telephone carriers. GPRS allows users to transmit packets of data across the carrier network to the Internet. One can roam to other networks as long as the mobile operators have agreements with each other. Just like in the days of X.25, the system requires many bilateral agreements between the carriers; their goal is to track and bill for each packet of information.Competing with this standard is WiFi. WiFi is just a simple wireless extension to the current Internet and many hotspots provide people with free access to the Internet in cafes and other public areas. WiFi service providers have emerged, while telephone operators –such as a T-Mobile and Vodaphone- are capitalizing on paid WiFi services. Just as with the Internet, network operators are threatening to shut down free WiFi providers, citing a violation of terms of service. Just as with X.25, the GPRS data network and the future data networks planned by the telephone carriers (e.g. 3G) are crippled with unwieldy standards bodies, bilateral agreements, and inherently complicated and expensive plant operations.It is clear that the simplicity of WiFi and the Internet is more efficient than the networks planned by the telephone companies. That said, the availability of low cost phones is controlled by mobile telephone carriers, their distribution networks and their subsidies.Content vs ContextMany of the mobile telephone carriers are hoping that users will purchase branded content manufactured in Hollywood and packaged and distributed by the telephone companies using sophisticated technology to thwart copying.Broadband in the home will always be cheaper than mobile broadband. Therefore it will be cheaper for people to download content at home and use storage devices to carry it with them rather than downloading or viewing content over a mobile phone network. Most entertainment content is not so time sensitive that it requires real time network access.The mobile carriers are making the same mistake that many of the network service providers made in the 80s. Consider Delphi, a joint venture between IBM and Sears Roebuck. Delphi assumed that branded content was going to be the main use of their system and designed the architecture of the network to provide users with such content. Conversely, the users ended up using primary email and communications and the system failed to provide such services effectively due to the mis-design.Similarly, it is clear that mobile computing is about communication. Not only are mobile phones being used for 1-1 communications, as expected through voice conversations; people are learning new forms of communication because of SMS, email and presence technologies. Often, the value of these communication processes is the transmission of “state” or “context” information; the content of the messages are less important.Copyright and the Creative CommonsIn addition to the constant flow of traffic keeping groups of people in touch with each other, significant changes are emerging in multimedia creation and sharing. The low cost of cameras and the nearly television studio quality capability of personal computers has caused an explosion in the number and quality of content being created by amateurs. Not only is this content easier to develop, people are using the power of weblogs and phones to distribute their creations to others. The network providers and many of the hardware providers are trying to build systems that make it difficult for users to share and manipulate multimedia content. Such regulation drastically stifles the users’ ability to produce, share and communicate. This is particularly surprising given that such activities are considered the primary “killer application” for networks.It may seem unintuitive to argue that packaged commercial content can co-exist alongside consumer content while concurrently stimulating content creation and sharing. In order to understand how this can work, it is crucial to understand how the current system of copyright is broken and can be fixed.First of all, copyright in the multimedia digital age is inherently broken. Historically, copyright works because it is difficult to copy or edit works and because only few people produce new works over a very long period of time. Today, technology allows us to find, sample, edit and share very quickly. The problem is that the current notion of copyright is not capable of addressing the complexity and the speed of what technology enables artists to create. Large copyright holders, notably Hollywood studios, have aggressively extended and strengthened their copyright protections to try to keep the ability to produce and distribute creative works in the realm of large corporations.Hollywood asserts, “all rights reserved” on works that they own. Sampling music, having a TV show running in the background in a movie scene or quoting lyrics to a song in a book about the history of music all require payment to and a negotiation with the copyright holder. Even though the Internet makes available a wide palette of wonderful works based on content from all over the world, the current copyright practices forbid most of such creation.However, most artists are happy to have their music sampled if they receive attribution. Most writers are happy to be quoted or have their books copied for non-commercial use. Most creators of content realize that all content builds on the past and the ability for people to build on what one has created is a natural and extremely important part of the creative process.Creative Commons tries to give artists that choice. By providing a more flexible copyright than the standards “all rights reserved” copyright of commercial content providers, Creative Commons allows artists to set a variety of rights to their works. This includes the ability to reuse for commercial use, copy, sample, require attribution, etc. Such an approach allows artists to decide how their work can be used, while providing people with the materials necessary for increased creation and sharing. Creative Commons also provides for a way to make the copyright of pieces of content machine-readable. This means that a search engine or other tool to manipulate content is able to read the copyright. As such, an artist can search for songs, images and text to use while having the information to provide the necessary attribution.Creative Commons can co-exist with the stringent copyright regimes of the Hollywood studios while allowing professional and amateur artists to take more control of how much they want their works to be shared and integrated into the commons. Until copyright law itself is fundamentally changed, the Creative Commons will provide an essential tool to provide an alternative to the completely inflexible copyright of commercial content. Content is not like some lump of gold to be horded and owned which diminishes in value each time it is shared. Content is a foundation upon which community and relationships are formed. Content is the foundation for culture. We must evolve beyond the current copyright regime that was developed in a world where the creation and transmission of content was unwieldy and expense, reserved to those privileged artists who were funded by commercial enterprises. This will provide the emerging wireless networks and mobile devices with the freedom necessary for them to become the community building tools of sharing that is their destiny.

Jibot 0.6 »

Jibot is the robot who lives in the #joiito channel. He was originally developed by rvr and became a group effort. With everyone hacking on him, he had gotten a bit flakey. termie with the help of a few others totally refactored him and now jibot is really happy. Thank you termie! Jibot has a wiki page, a blog and a sourceforge page for the code....

Off to Linz »

I'm at Narita airport on my way to Linz to be on the Digital Communities jury of Ars Electronica. I think this is my eighth year as a jury member for Ars Electronica so going to Linz feels like going back to an old home. I look forward to eating my favorite wienerschnitzel soon....

Doonesbury's B.D. injured in Iraq »

GregIn case you haven't been keeping up with your Doonesbury, Gary Trudeau has crossed an interesting landmark: B.D. has been injured while on reservist duty in Iraq. And his helmet has come off.Today's Doonsebury...

Sean Parker kicked out of Plaxo »

Although I had some problems with the Plaxo model, I hate hearing stories like this. Sean Parker, the founder and visionary behind Plaxo was kicked out rather rudely by the VCs. I don't know the details, but it sounds bad.San Jose MercuryThe company sent out an anonymous, terse statement that Parker is ``no longer with Plaxo,'' but called him a ``visionary, creative entrepreneur'' and ended with: ``We thank him for his hard work and wish him well.'' In reality, though, a source said Parker has been locked out, and everyone at the company has been instructed not to talk with...

Preparing takenoko »

Takenoko are bamboo shoots. We're in takenoko season right now. You take a special hoe and walk around in a bamboo forest until you step on the tip of the takenoko. The best and most tender takenoko are the ones that are barely visible. As they grow larger, they become tougher. You have to then dig around the takenoko, find where it attaches to the root network and chop it at the right angle to get it to come off easily. Then you shuck them. After shucking, a very important step is the aku nuki. Many vegetables, particularly takenoko...

Social Software needs to show the seams »

Although I think the "socially awkward" and the "what's the point" problem of some social networking sites is a problem, I think the "suck up your email addresses from outlook" and the one click "spam all of my friends" features are the most troublesome. Stowe Boyd talks about his accidental "spam my friends with one click" episode with Zero Degrees. Actually, what I find scarier is the way Spoke takes all of your email address from your headers and makes a network out of them. Even if you don't "join" Spoke, if someone who you exchange email with joins, you're...

'Lost in Translation' doesn't translate well in Japan »

It appears that the Japanese agree that 'Lost in Translation' doesn't translate well in Japan - The Christian Science Monitor. Interest in context of previous comments on post about racial stereotypes in the movie....

Inba Standard Time »

I've spent the last few days hanging out at home holding down the fort while Mizuka has been busy with other stuff. I'm still adjusting to the local time zone. It is primarily an agricultural area so everyone goes to bed at 8 pm and wakes up at 5 or 6 am. Yesterday, the a few of the women from the village came by at 7:30 am to tell me it was my turn to help clean the assembly hall. "When?" "Um... Now." "Sorry, I've got to take my friend to the station and take care of a few things."...

Technorati support »

You can now track who is linking to particular posts on my blog by clicking the Technorati link next to link next to trackbacks at the bottom of the post. The result is similar to trackbacks, but these links are links that have been discovered by Technorati, whereas trackbacks are links that are sent to me directly by other bloggers. Boing Boing recently started Technorati support and Dave Sifry explains how to add this to your blog. Since I don't get as many links as Boing Boing, clicking the Technorati link will often yield no results. I think we need...

A9 »

I've been messing around with A9, Amazon's search engine project. It integrates search inside the book, Alexa and the recommendation engine on Amazon so you can find web pages and Amazon will recommend other sites that you might like. Considering how "meta data savvy" Amazon is and how easily they can connect search to their core business, I can see A9 giving Google a pretty good run for their money. Here's the "joi.ito.com" on Amazon. I'm not sure whether I like the fact that they list my address and phone number. Also, I find the data on Alexa a bit...

Japanese hostages in Iraq freed »

Three Japanese Hostages Freed in Iraq; Italian Captive Killed via Al...

ecto for Windows »

Alex Hung has joined forces with us to make a Windows version of Adriaan's OS X blogging client ecto based on his original client, TypeWriter. Check out the ecto for Windows page for details on the beta test....

Cosplay community site "Cure" »

The Japanese "sort of equivalent" of SuicideGirls is Cure, a cosplay sight. The biggest difference is that the sexy pictures are not allowed. It's quite an amazing community. There are 5000 layers (comes from Cosplayers) and 30,000 cameko (comes from camera kozo or "Camera Boys"). The layers can be sorted by ranking or by the characters they play. The cameko are otaku who spend their lives taking pictures of the layers and giving beautiful prints of their photos to the layers and sharing them online. The site lets you send these photos to or view them on your mobile phones....

Bluetooth against Bush and intellectual property »

Smart MobsBluetooth against Bush and intellectual property Bluetooth Against Bush, a political organizing tool, received a cease and desist order from the Bluetooth SIG for trademark reasons.You better watch out Robert!...

Iraqi man claims Japanese hostages will be executed one by one from later tonight »

Australian Broadcasting CorporationAn Iraqi man claiming to have spoken to the kidnappers says the hostages will be executed one by one from later tonight if the demands are not met. Via The Command Post...

U.S. Won't Let Company Test All Its Cattle for Mad Cow »

The New York TimesU.S. Won't Let Company Test All Its Cattle for Mad Cow The Department of Agriculture refused yesterday to allow a Kansas beef producer to test all of its cattle for mad cow disease, saying such sweeping tests were not scientifically warranted. The producer, Creekstone Farms Premium Beef, wanted to use recently approved rapid tests so it could resume selling its fat-marbled black Angus beef to Japan, which banned American beef after a cow slaughtered in Washington State last December tested positive for mad cow. The company has complained that the ban is costing it $40,000 a day...

Abe wants to revise Constitution to use SDF in hostage crisis »

Japan TodayAbe wants to revise Constitution to use SDF in hostage crisis Monday, April 12, 2004 at 06:47 JST TOKYO — Shinzo Abe, secretary general of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, called Sunday for amending the Constitution to enable the government to mobilize the Self-Defense Forces in such eventualities as the current hostage crisis in Iraq.Obviously the US doesn't have a monopoly on using tragedies and fear to push their political agenda. I personally am not against revising the constitution and I can see how it makes "political sense" to do it now, but it still bugs me. People make...

Hostages Update »

The Command PostHostages Released? Fox TV is reporting that at least eight hostages have been released and the three Japanese hostages are “safe.” No confirmation on this yet, will follow up.AljazeeraFate of Japanese hostages uncertain Monday 12 April 2004, 4:44 Makka Time, 1:44 GMT The lives of three Japanese hostages in Iraq are still in jeopardy, with their captors apparently threatening to start killing them unless Japan withdraws its forcesAljazeeraEight foreign hostages freed Sunday 11 April 2004, 21:39 Makka Time, 18:39 GMT An Iraqi group says it has released eight foreign hostages following the intervention of Muslim scholars on their...

Making fun of changing social norms »

Gen KanaiFunny keitai photo (the caption on the sticker can be loosely) translated as: "Games should be played only in game arcades." (Which is a riff on the fact that it is rude to talk on the mobile phone on the train here in Japan.)The little Sega logo on the top right makes me think it's a Sega ad making fun of people who used to think games weren't for homes. Maybe they were copying the Pepsi/iTunes commercial and glorifying the criminals. I wonder if the expected social norm of not talking on the phone in trains in Japan will...

Tough jab at GW's jokes as a satire video »

Dan GillmorVia Wonkette, here's a slightly unfair but powerful rejoinder to President Bush's jokes about weapons of mass destruction. Media is in the hands of everyone, and people are going to use it to hold powerful people -- including media people, such as the Washington correspondents who found Bush's performance so hilarious -- to account.People seem to really be embracing web video as a medium and it definitely delivers the message at a different level than text. Very interesting to see how this form develops....

Jr. Butterfly »

Yesterday, Mizuka and I went to Tokyo Bunka Kaikan in Ueno to see the opera Jr. Butterfly. Jr. Butterfly was composed by our friend Shigeaki Saegusa. The libretto was our friend Masahiko Shimada and the conductor was Naoto Otomo. Tenor Shigehiro Sano performs Jr. Butterfly and soprano Shinobu Sato plays Naomi, his love. Madam Butterfly was an opera by Giacoma Puccini based on a story by John Luther Long. Puccini's opera opened in 1904, 100 years ago. Jr. Butterfly is the story of what happens to the son of Madame Butterfly and Pinkerton. It is set before, during and after...

Japanese hostages 'to be freed' »

Japanese hostages 'to be freed' - BBCi Iraqi group to free Japanese hostages - Aljazeera The Japanese hostages in Iraq are supposed to be freed in a few hours. I'm watching the TV news for more information now. UPDATE: Japan awaits news about hostages - BBC...

Japgrish »

Everyone makes fun of the Japanese use of English. (See Engrish) The Chicago Tribune has a story featuring Chicagoans with tattoos Japanese characters and a comparison of what the bearers think they mean and what they really mean in Japanese. Very funny. via MetaFilter and Boing Boing...

Japanese hostages threatened with cannibalism in Iraq »

The Japanese news has been suppressing the more vivid videos of the hostage situation in Iraq and continue the "we are not pulling out" line. One piece of news that even the West seems to be suppressing is that the Japanese hostages are being threatened with cannibalism.Reuters"We tell you that three of your children have fallen prisoner in our hands and we give you two options -- withdraw your forces from our country and go home or we will burn them alive and feed them to the fighters," the group said.Most reports are saying "killed" or "burned alive". via The...

Easter Show Includes Bunny-Whipping, Broken Eggs »

Easter Show Includes Bunny-Whipping, Broken Eggs The horror... via Metafilter...

NYT Op-Ed on Iraq »

A good op-ed by Maureen Dowd in the New York Times about the situation in Iraq....

Sergey Brin in Drag »

Sergey Brin in Drag - EXCLUSIVE on Google Weblog...

Opting out of Plaxo »

Apologies to friends who use Plaxo, but I'm opting out of Plaxo since it has become a source of spam for me and I feel like I'm doing all the work. Anyone who wants to find my contact info can just Google me or find it on my wiki page. via Dan Gillmor...

The Kizuna gathering »

I am hosting a gathering here in Tokyo starting tomorrow. It's a somewhat academic meeting to talk about social science issues and technological issues around mobility and microcontent. Participants include a small group of academics, technologists and business people. I'll let you know if we come up with anything interesting. Some of the other participants will probably be blogging as well. This is the first time that I've ever worked together with my sister to organize something so that's been fun. It's also been great working with the team at the Insight & Foresight unit at Nokia who are supporting...

Foreigners and Japanese customs »

A lot of people ask me about Japanese customs. They learn the formal way to hand business cards, they bow deeply when they meet Japanese and they call me "Ito-san." Stop that. It's silly. To some Japanese, the awkward foreigners trying to please their hosts by acting Japanese may look cute, but more likely than not, you'll get a A for effort but you'll be forever the silly foreigner in their minds. It's only the extremely intolerant xenophobe who would really want a foreigner to really act Japanese and you don't want to be hanging out with those anyway. Keep...

The Last Samurai and the Japanese code of honor »

I just finished watching The Last Samurai. I'm not going to comment on the acting or the historical accuracy, but rather on this notion of a code of honor. Several people told me to watch it because they were impressed with the code of honor in the film. I think there is something comforting about codes of honor and people get goose bumps when they see movies where heros die for honor. Some people identify with the heros as they reflect on the unfairness and loneliness in their own lives. A friend of mine manages the rights to Musashi by...

Microsoft's embarrassing metadata »

A hacker grabbed all of the Word files on microsoft.com and scanned the edit/revision metadata. Very funny. Ooops. ;-) Via boing boing...

Mena's Corner »

Mena starts corporate blogging at Six Apart on Mena's Corner....

See you later Cannes »

See you later Cannes and thanks for all the mussels. I met some really cool people this trip and got a glimpse into "the other side". Enjoyed myself very much. Weather was beautiful too. Now I'm off to Tokyo via Frankfurt. I have a horrible 4 hours layover in Frankfurt. Anyone going to be in Frankfurt this afternoon? Maybe we can play scrabble or something......

Milia / MipTV Update »

I just gave a keynote this morning and I initially felt right, but a bit bad. Milia is one of the oldest and leading interactive content conferences and MipTV is a place where content providers meet with people who want to buy content from them. The halls are full of telephone companies, TV networks, Hollywood content providers and DRM technology companies. So here I am asked to give a keynote. What am I going to say? I talked about the shift in value away from packaged content and towards context oriented things like location, presence and transactions. I talked about...

Conference back channels »

Interesting discussion over at Liz Lawley's blog about conference back channels. Relates to the Continuous Partial Attention discussion....

Math Joke »

I just got this via email and don't know the copyright or the origin of this. If someone knows whether I should give credit to someone, please let me know. But it's too funny not to blog....
Whiplash by Joi Ito and Jeff Howe

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